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*the advantage of someone

 and *the advantage over someone
; *an advantage over someone; *the advantage over someone; *the edge on someone; *the edge over someone a position superior to that of someone else; a status wherein one controls or has superiority or authority over someone else. (*Typically: get ~; give someone ~; have ~.) She'd gotten an advantage over me at the start of the competition. I got an edge on Sally, too, and she came in second.
See also: advantage, of

culturally advantaged

Euph. rich; upper-class. I can't deny I had a culturally advantaged upbringing. The charity appealed to culturally advantaged people to donate time and money to those less fortunate.

show something to good advantage

to display the best features of something; to display something so that its best features are apparent. Put the vase in the center of the table and show it to good advantage. Having and using a large vocabulary shows your intelligence to good advantage.
See also: advantage, good, show

take advantage of someone

1. to deceive someone. I knew that you wouldn't take advantage of me! I trusted you. Please don't take advantage of me the way you took advantage of Carl.
2. to impose on someone. I am glad to have your help. I hope I am not taking advantage of you. I am glad to do it. You are not taking advantage of me.
See also: advantage, of, take

take advantage of someone or something

to utilize someone or something to the fullest extent. Try to take advantage of every opportunity that comes your way. Please take advantage of the consultant while she is here in the office.
See also: advantage, of, take

turn something to one's advantage

to make an advantage for oneself out of something (which might otherwise be a disadvantage). Sally found a way to turn the problem to her advantage. The ice cream store manager was able to turn the hot weather to her advantage.
See also: advantage, turn

take advantage (of something)

also take full advantage (of something)
to use an opportunity to get or achieve something He took advantage of the prison's education program to earn a college degree. There are peaches and strawberries grown on the farm, and I sure take full advantage of them.
Usage notes: often said of someone who has opportunities that others do not have: The rich can take advantage of clever accounting tricks to avoid taxes.
See also: advantage, take

take advantage (of somebody)

to use someone's weakness to improve your own situation Mr. Smith often takes advantage of my friendship and leaves the unpleasant tasks for me to do.
See also: advantage, take

to advantage

in a way that helps you We had to learn to use the landscape to advantage in combat. She chose a dress that would show her fine figure to advantage.
See also: advantage

get the advantage of

Also, get or have the advantage over . Be in a superior position to, as in He had the advantage over me, since I couldn't even remember his name, let alone his position . [Mid-1500s] Also see get the better of; get the drop on.
See also: advantage, get, of

show to advantage

Also, show to good or one's advantage . Display in a flattering way, benefit, as in This lighting shows the paintings to advantage, or Your extensive use of quotations shows your learning to good advantage. [Mid-1300s]
See also: advantage, show

take advantage of

Put to good use; avail oneself of; also, profit selfishly by, exploit. For example, Let's take advantage of the good weather and go hiking, or They really take advantage of her good nature, getting her to do all the disagreeable chores . [Late 1300s]
See also: advantage, of, take

take advantage of

1. To put to good use; avail oneself of: take advantage of all educational opportunities.
2. To make use of for selfish reasons; achieve a selfish goal by exploiting: took advantage of him by leaving him with the bill; took advantage of his unsuspecting nature.
3. To seduce.
See also: advantage, of, take

to advantage

To good effect; favorably: The roses were displayed to advantage in a blue vase.
See also: advantage
References in classic literature ?
We will endeavour to do our duty by her, and she will, at least, have the advantage of companions of her own age, and of a regular instructress.
     Would it advantage you to dwell therein
For as all the inhabitants of each country are struggling together with nicely balanced forces, extremely slight modifications in the structure or habits of one inhabitant would often give it an advantage over others; and still further modifications of the same kind would often still further increase the advantage.
Among others of this kind was Dr Blifil, a gentleman who had the misfortune of losing the advantage of great talents by the obstinacy of a father, who would breed him to a profession he disliked.
They agreed that the modern plough ploughed better, that the scarifier did the work more quickly, but they found thousands of reasons that made it out of the question for them to use either of them; and though he had accepted the conviction that he would have to lower the standard of cultivation, he felt sorry to give up improved methods, the advantages of which were so obvious.
A second and a third party of knights took the field; and although they had various success, yet, upon the whole, the advantage decidedly remained with the challengers, not one of whom lost his seat or swerved from his charge misfortunes which befell one or two of their antagonists in each encounter.
Now in order to kill the enemy, our men must be roused to anger; that there may be advantage from defeating the enemy, they must have their rewards
Thurle an excellent neighbour, I assure you--such a one as you will feel glad to have accommodated by the little plan I'm going to mention, especially as I hope you will find it as much to your own advantage as his.
I never used my razor during my stay in the island, but although a very subordinate affair, it had been vastly admired by the Typees; and Narmonee, a great hero among them, who was exceedingly precise in the arrangements of his toilet and the general adjustment of is person, being the most accurately tattooed and laboriously horrified individual in all the valley, thought it would be a great advantage to have it applied to the already shaven crown of his head.
Their war plans were abandoned for the present, and they determined to return to the Arickara town, where they hoped to obtain from the white men arms and ammunition that would enable them to take the field with advantage over their enemies.
So, quickly making her toilet, she quietly left the house, and, taking advantage of every shadow and substance which could hide her, followed him on his walk.
Miss Thorpe, however, being four years older than Miss Morland, and at least four years better informed, had a very decided advantage in discussing such points; she could compare the balls of Bath with those of Tunbridge, its fashions with the fashions of London; could rectify the opinions of her new friend in many articles of tasteful attire; could discover a flirtation between any gentleman and lady who only smiled on each other; and point out a quiz through the thickness of a crowd.
So much had his great strength and agility increased in the period following his maturity that he had come to believe that he might master the redoubtable Terkoz in a hand to hand fight were it not for the terrible advantage the anthropoid's huge fighting fangs gave him over the poorly armed Tarzan.
Because you fancy that the shepherd or neatherd fattens of tends the sheep or oxen with a view to their own good and not to the good of himself or his master; and you further imagine that the rulers of states, if they are true rulers, never think of their subjects as sheep, and that they are not studying their own advantage day and night.
Verily, the crafty ego, the loveless one, that seeketh its advantage in the advantage of many--it is not the origin of the herd, but its ruin.