advantage


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*the advantage of someone

 and *the advantage over someone
; *an advantage over someone; *the advantage over someone; *the edge on someone; *the edge over someone a position superior to that of someone else; a status wherein one controls or has superiority or authority over someone else. (*Typically: get ~; give someone ~; have ~.) She'd gotten an advantage over me at the start of the competition. I got an edge on Sally, too, and she came in second.
See also: advantage, of

culturally advantaged

Euph. rich; upper-class. I can't deny I had a culturally advantaged upbringing. The charity appealed to culturally advantaged people to donate time and money to those less fortunate.

show something to good advantage

to display the best features of something; to display something so that its best features are apparent. Put the vase in the center of the table and show it to good advantage. Having and using a large vocabulary shows your intelligence to good advantage.
See also: advantage, good, show

take advantage of someone

 
1. to deceive someone. I knew that you wouldn't take advantage of me! I trusted you. Please don't take advantage of me the way you took advantage of Carl.
2. to impose on someone. I am glad to have your help. I hope I am not taking advantage of you. I am glad to do it. You are not taking advantage of me.
See also: advantage, of, take

take advantage of someone or something

to utilize someone or something to the fullest extent. Try to take advantage of every opportunity that comes your way. Please take advantage of the consultant while she is here in the office.
See also: advantage, of, take

turn something to one's advantage

to make an advantage for oneself out of something (which might otherwise be a disadvantage). Sally found a way to turn the problem to her advantage. The ice cream store manager was able to turn the hot weather to her advantage.
See also: advantage, turn

take advantage (of something)

also take full advantage (of something)
to use an opportunity to get or achieve something He took advantage of the prison's education program to earn a college degree. There are peaches and strawberries grown on the farm, and I sure take full advantage of them.
Usage notes: often said of someone who has opportunities that others do not have: The rich can take advantage of clever accounting tricks to avoid taxes.
See also: advantage, take

take advantage (of somebody)

to use someone's weakness to improve your own situation Mr. Smith often takes advantage of my friendship and leaves the unpleasant tasks for me to do.
See also: advantage, take

to advantage

in a way that helps you We had to learn to use the landscape to advantage in combat. She chose a dress that would show her fine figure to advantage.
See also: advantage

get the advantage of

Also, get or have the advantage over . Be in a superior position to, as in He had the advantage over me, since I couldn't even remember his name, let alone his position . [Mid-1500s] Also see get the better of; get the drop on.
See also: advantage, get, of

show to advantage

Also, show to good or one's advantage . Display in a flattering way, benefit, as in This lighting shows the paintings to advantage, or Your extensive use of quotations shows your learning to good advantage. [Mid-1300s]
See also: advantage, show

take advantage of

Put to good use; avail oneself of; also, profit selfishly by, exploit. For example, Let's take advantage of the good weather and go hiking, or They really take advantage of her good nature, getting her to do all the disagreeable chores . [Late 1300s]
See also: advantage, of, take

take advantage of

1. To put to good use; avail oneself of: take advantage of all educational opportunities.
2. To make use of for selfish reasons; achieve a selfish goal by exploiting: took advantage of him by leaving him with the bill; took advantage of his unsuspecting nature.
3. To seduce.
See also: advantage, of, take

to advantage

To good effect; favorably: The roses were displayed to advantage in a blue vase.
See also: advantage
References in classic literature ?
If I kill him," thought Tarzan, "what advantage will it be to me?
 From the coals that he'd preferred to the advantages of truth.
Thus it is, as I believe, that when the males and females of any animal have the same general habits of life, but differ in structure, colour, or ornament, such differences have been mainly caused by sexual selection; that is, individual males have had, in successive generations, some slight advantage over other males, in their weapons, means of defence, or charms; and have transmitted these advantages to their male offspring.
No naturalist doubts the advantage of what has been called the 'physiological division of labour;' hence we may believe that it would be advantageous to a plant to produce stamens alone in one flower or on one whole plant, and pistils alone in another flower or on another plant.
Thus it might be a great advantage to the hive-bee to have a slightly longer or differently constructed proboscis.
And when the artist is benefited by receiving pay the advantage is gained by an additional use of the art of pay, which is not the art professed by him?
He had besides received proper hints from his brother, which he failed not to improve to the best advantage.
It is no wonder that in an age when this kind of merit is so little in fashion, and so slenderly provided for, persons possessed of it should very eagerly flock to a place where they were sure of being received with great complaisance; indeed, where they might enjoy almost the same advantages of a liberal fortune as if they were entitled to it in their own right; for Mr Allworthy was not one of those generous persons who are ready most bountifully to bestow meat, drink, and lodging on men of wit and learning, for which they expect no other return but entertainment, instruction, flattery, and subserviency; in a word, that such persons should be enrolled in the number of domestics, without wearing their master's cloathes, or receiving wages.
However, she listened very willingly to my offer of advice; so I told her that the first thing she ought to do was a piece of justice to herself, namely, that whereas she had been told by several people that he had reported among the ladies that he had left her, and pretended to give the advantage of the negative to himself, she should take care to have it well spread among the women--which she could not fail of an opportunity to do in a neighbourhood so addicted to family news as that she live in was--that she had inquired into his circumstances, and found he was not the man as to estate he pretended to be.
Thus I convinced her, that if the men made their advantage of our sex in the affair of marriage, upon the supposition of there being such choice to be had, and of the women being so easy, it was only owing to this, that the women wanted courage to maintain their ground and to play their part; and that, according to my Lord Rochester,
In short, he left himself no room to ask any more questions about her estate, and she took the advantage of it like a prudent woman, for she placed part of her fortune so in trustees, without letting him know anything of it, that it was quite out of his reach, and made him be very well content with the rest.
This relation may serve, therefore, to let the ladies see that the advantage is not so much on the other side as the men think it is; and though it may be true that the men have but too much choice among us, and that some women may be found who will dishonour themselves, be cheap, and easy to come at, and will scarce wait to be asked, yet if they will have women, as I may say, worth having, they may find them as uncomeatable as ever and that those that are otherwise are a sort of people that have such deficiencies, when had, as rather recommend the ladies that are difficult than encourage the men to go on with their easy courtship, and expect wives equally valuable that will come at first call.
But when Levin hinted at the future advantages, Ivan's face expressed alarm and regret that he could not hear all he had to say, and he made haste to find himself some task that would admit of no delay: he either snatched up the fork to pitch the hay out of the pens, or ran to get water or to clear out the dung.
They agreed that the modern plough ploughed better, that the scarifier did the work more quickly, but they found thousands of reasons that made it out of the question for them to use either of them; and though he had accepted the conviction that he would have to lower the standard of cultivation, he felt sorry to give up improved methods, the advantages of which were so obvious.
Often, too, talking to the peasants and explaining to them all the advantages of the plan, Levin felt that the peasants heard nothing but the sound of his voice, and were firmly resolved, whatever he might say, not to let themselves be taken in.
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