admit

(redirected from admits)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms.

admit defeat

To yield to the opposition or accept that one is wrong in some pursuit. Well, I ran a good campaign, but it is time I admitted defeat in this election.
See also: admit, defeat

admit someone (in)to (some place)

to allow someone to enter some place. They refused to admit us into the theater.
See also: admit

admit something into something

to allow something to be introduced into something else. You cannot admit this document into the body of evidence!
See also: admit

admit something to someone

to confess something to someone. Harry admitted his error to his uncle.
See also: admit

admit to something

to acknowledge or confess something; to acknowledge or confess to having done something. Max would not admit to anything.
See also: admit

admit into

v.
To allow someone or something to enter or be a part of something: This school does not admit students into a degree program without a high school diploma. The judge admitted the documents into evidence. We were admitted into the theater even though we were very late.
See also: admit

admit of

v.
To allow the possibility of something: This problem admits of two very different solutions.
See also: admit, of

admit to

v.
1. To confess something to someone: I didn't want to admit my crimes to them. At first they lied, but later they admitted to the police that they had stolen the bicycle.
2. To confess something: He will never admit to feeling jealous. She admitted to her lies.
See also: admit
References in classic literature ?
It is by themselves changing that substances admit contrary qualities.
He admits that the democrats are right in insisting that equality is a necessary element in the state, though he thinks they do not admit the importance of other equally necessary elements.
He is forced to admit that the state is not possible without the co-operation of men whom he will not admit to membership in it, either because they are not capable of sufficient rational appreciation of political ends, like the barbarians whom he thought were natural slaves, or because the leisure necessary for citizenship can only be gained by the work of the artisans who by that very work make themselves incapable of the life which they make possible for others.
That the geological record is imperfect all will admit; but that it is imperfect to the degree which I require, few will be inclined to admit.
If we admit that the geological record is imperfect in an extreme degree, then such facts as the record gives, support the theory of descent with modification.
If we do NOT know them all--if Nature has still secrets in the deeps for us, nothing is more conformable to reason than to admit the existence of fishes, or cetaceans of other kinds, or even of new species, of an organisation formed to inhabit the strata inaccessible to soundings, and which an accident of some sort has brought at long intervals to the upper level of the ocean.
If, on the contrary, we DO know all living kinds, we must necessarily seek for the animal in question amongst those marine beings already classed; and, in that case, I should be disposed to admit the existence of a gigantic narwhal.
Nor will it admit any laws but its own laws; nor any authority but its own authority.
It is strong circumstantial evidence, I will admit, but it is not positive proof.
Do you admit that Pavlicheff overwhelmed you with benefits, and perhaps saved your life?
Had he not told her, yes, told her to make a list, and not to admit anyone who was not on that list?
I am not of the declining sort, though I'll admit it was something like telling a man that you would like a bath and in consequence being instantly knocked overboard to sink or swim with your clothes on.
When they make them rightly, they make them agreeably to their interest; when they are mistaken, contrary to their interest; you admit that?
Do you admit that education is a benefit for the people?
Idiotic propositions of a parallel nature have been freely offered for my acceptance, and I have been called upon to admit that I would give Poor Law relief to anybody, anywhere, anyhow.