acting


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Related to acting: Method acting

act as

To serve or perform a job or role, often temporarily. Until Kayla returns from her maternity leave, Sharon will act as lead analyst. You will now act as file clerk and benefits coordinator, and your salary will reflect this change.
See also: act

act for

1. To be a representative for someone else. Because I have power of attorney for my mother, I can act for her in legal and financial matters when she is no longer able to do so.
2. To perform a job or role in place of the person that usually does it. Yes, Kayla usually leads this project, but I am acting for her while she is on maternity leave.
See also: act

act (up)on

1. To take action in a situation. The report is due tomorrow, so I need you to act on it immediately. Please act upon this subpoena for records at once.
2. To take action that is strongly influenced by certain information or advice. ("Upon" is most commonly used to convey this meaning.) Acting upon my doctor's orders, I cleared my schedule and spent the week recuperating at home. A; "I can't believe he said that about us!" B: "Well, he's probably just acting on his mother's instruction, and that woman hates us."
3. To impact in some way. The barking dogs next door are acting on my patience.
See also: act

act out

1. To behave poorly or inappropriately, especially considering one's age. My son is always so happy at home, so I can't understand why he's suddenly acting out at school. You're in middle school now, so if you act out in class, you will be sent to the principal's office.
2. To perform a role, often an imaginary one (as in a play). Jennifer did a superb job acting out the role of Auntie Mame in the play. I don't want to upset my mom during the holidays, so I am acting out the part of dutiful daughter.
3. To express one's negative feelings, usually to another person. I got tired of Mark constantly acting out his anger out on me, so I ended our relationship.
4. To communicate through actions or gestures instead of words. Henry was suffering from a severe case of laryngitis and had lost his voice, so he had to act out his thoughts during the meeting. There's no talking in this game—you have to act out the movie you're assigned, and we will try to guess it.
See also: act, out

act the fool

1. To behave comically or playfully, often to amuse others. If you continue to act the fool, you're going to have to leave the classroom. Joe never acts the fool—he's always serious.
2. To behave irresponsibly or immaturely, especially in an environment where it is especially inappropriate. Don't let me catch any of you kids acting the fool at the museum—it's a privilege to even go inside. We finally get invited to a nice dinner party and you have to go and act the fool—what's wrong with you?
See also: act, fool

act the goat

To behave comically or playfully, often to amuse others. Joe never acts the goat—he's always serious. If you continue to act the goat, you're going to have to leave the classroom.
See also: act, goat

act up

1. Of a person, to behave poorly or inappropriately. If you act up in class, you will be sent to the principal's office.
2. Of a thing, to malfunction or operate incorrectly. My car's transmission started acting up during my commute to work. My phone acted up again this morning; I think I need to take it to a professional.
3. Of a medical condition, to become problematic or troublesome, usually after a period of remission. Jake played football with his friends today, and now his old knee injury is acting up. It's springtime, so of course my allergies are acting up again.
See also: act, up

act as someone

to perform in the capacity of someone, temporarily or permanently; to serve in some special capacity, possibly temporarily. This is Mr. Smith. He'll act as manager from now on.
See also: act

act for someone

 
1. to represent someone in an official capacity; to represent the interests of someone. Don't worry. I am acting for the owner. I am his real estate agent.
2. to take action when the proper person fails to take action. I had to act for her since she was out of town.
See also: act

act Out

to behave badly. (Usually used to describe young people.) Your son has been acting out in the classroom, and his teacher feels that professional intervention is desirable.
See also: act, out

act something out

 
1. to perform in real life a role that one has imagined in a fantasy. When I was onstage, I was really acting an old fantasy out. I acted out an old fantasy onstage.
2. to convert one's bad feelings into action rather than words. Don't act your aggressions out on me! She acted out her aggression.
3. to demonstrate or communicate something through gestures or action rather than words. Act your request out, if you can't say it. She had a sore throat and had to act out her request.
See also: act, out

act up

[for a thing or a person] to behave badly. This car is acting up again.
See also: act, up

act out

to behave badly because you are unhappy or upset These kids are very angry and act out because their lives are a mess.
Etymology: based on the idea of acting out a story (telling a story through physical actions)
See also: act, out

act up

1. to behave badly Sometimes kids act up because they just want attention.
Usage notes: usually used to refer to children
2. to operate badly My computer began acting up and I lost a whole day's work.
3. to become active Her allergies acted up when she went hiking in the woods.
Usage notes: usually used to refer to a medical condition
See also: act, up

act/play the fool

to behave in a silly way, often in order to make people laugh Come on guys, stop acting the fool and pay attention.
See also: act, fool

act/play the goat

  (informal)
to behave in a silly way, sometimes in order to make people laugh Insecure and lonely, he resorted to acting the goat to get people's attention.
See also: act, goat

act out

1. Perform or portray something or someone, as in As she read to the class, the teacher had each child act out a different character in the story . [c. 1600]
2. Express unconscious feelings or impulses through one's behavior, without being aware of it. For example, She acted out her anger at her father by screaming at her husband. This meaning comes from 20th-century psychological theory and usually (but not always) refers to negative or hostile impulses and emotions. The term is sometimes used without an object to mean "misbehave" or "behave disruptively," as in The child is acting out in class. [First half of 1900s] In both usages, out means "openly" or "publicly."
See also: act, out

act up

1. Misbehave. For example, With an inexperienced rider, this horse always acts up. [c. 1900]
2. Malfunction, as in I'm not sure what's wrong with my car, but the transmission is acting up. In both usages up means "abnormally."
See also: act, up

act out

v.
1. To communicate something through actions rather than words: In a game of charades, you describe words by acting them out. One comedian acted out simple phrases, and the other one tried to guess what they were.
2. To play some role: The first graders acted out the roles of the villagers in the school play.
3. To fulfill some role: Though they no longer trusted him, they continued to act out their parts as good wife and daughter.
4. To express some feeling or emotion behaviorally, especially unconsciously: I understand why you're angry, but I don't like the way you're acting out your aggression toward me.
5. To demonstrate bad behavior or negative feelings: The student was upset after losing the game and began to act out in class.
See also: act, out

act up

v.
1. To misbehave: The driver stopped the school bus because the kids were acting up.
2. To cause problems by operating strangely or unexpectedly: The thermostat suddenly started acting up, and now it's always too hot or too cold in here.
3. To become active or troublesome after a period of operating normally: My knee starts acting up when the weather is cold.
See also: act, up
References in periodicals archive ?
The proposed transactions may not be consummated before the fifteenth calendar day after the effective date of this order, or later than three months after the effective date of this order, unless such period is extended for good cause by the Board or the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, acting pursuant to delegated authority.
The banking transaction shall not be consummated before the fifteenth calendar day after the effective date of this order, and the transaction may not be consummated later than three months after the effective date of this order, unless such period is extended for good cause by the Board or by the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, acting pursuant to delegated authority.
It is perhaps Jasper Johns' youthful work that most clearly, even eloquently integrates acting out (through gesture) and turning off of feeling (through its semiotics).
13] Yet such gestural acting out--such apparently arbitrary gestures as ironic emblems of one's aliveness--can become fanatic, an instrument of the "ideological mind" that Erik H.
This transaction shall not be consummated later than three months after the effective date of this order, unless such period is extended for good cause by the Board or the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, acting pursuant to delegated authority.
In acting on notices to acquire a savings association, the Board also reviews the records of performance of the relevant depository institutions under the Community Reinvestment Act (12 U.
that the transference ultimately address the analyst alone, that feels the analysand's no's and keeps him to the grind of acting out.
It's a time-release caption to the advance originally held by psychotherapists (including psychoanalysts) in Nazi Germany, who were real eager to apply the success story of Freud's encounter with war neurotics to a total victory through analysis: the all-out eradication-through-healing of the homosexual position or disposition (which ever since World War I marked the spot of the coming out of war neurosis under fire and the acting out of primal submissions through betrayal, desertion, even espionage).
The proposal shall not be consummated before the fifteenth calendar day after the effective date of this order, or later than three months after the effective date of this order, unless such period is extended for good cause by the Board or by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, acting pursuant to delegated authority.
The Board notes that the OCC will evaluate Bank's actual record of meeting the credit needs of the Albany community, including LMI neighborhoods, in future CRA performance examinations of Bank, and the Board will carefully consider that record in acting on future applications by CCB to acquire an insured depository institution.
If this argument is successful in showing that the responsible person acted ultra vires, it will be difficult for the IRS to prove that the individual was acting as "agent" or "in behalf" of the corporation when his actions were unknown and unauthorized by the corporation and were in breach of the fiduciary duties incumbent on an officer/director.
The Tax Court further held that Anderson's fraudulent intent should be imputed to the corporation since he was acting in behalf of, and not against, the interests of the corporation.
The BHC Act also requires the Board, in acting on an application, to consider the financial and managerial resources and future prospects of the companies and banks involved in a proposal, the convenience and needs of the community to be served, and certain other supervisory factors.
The acquisition shall not be consummated before the fifteenth calendar day after the effective date of this order, and the proposal shall not be consummated later than three months after the effective date of this order, unless such period is extended for good cause by the Board or by the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, acting pursuant to delegated authority.
The proposed acquisition of Glen Burnie shall not be consummated before the fifteenth calendar day following the effective date of this order, and not later than three months after the effective date of this order, unless such period is extended for good cause by the Board or by the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, acting pursuant to delegated authority.