act out


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia.
Related to act out: act up

act Out

to behave badly. (Usually used to describe young people.) Your son has been acting out in the classroom, and his teacher feels that professional intervention is desirable.
See also: act, out

act something out

 
1. to perform in real life a role that one has imagined in a fantasy. When I was onstage, I was really acting an old fantasy out. I acted out an old fantasy onstage.
2. to convert one's bad feelings into action rather than words. Don't act your aggressions out on me! She acted out her aggression.
3. to demonstrate or communicate something through gestures or action rather than words. Act your request out, if you can't say it. She had a sore throat and had to act out her request.
See also: act, out

act out

to behave badly because you are unhappy or upset These kids are very angry and act out because their lives are a mess.
Etymology: based on the idea of acting out a story (telling a story through physical actions)
See also: act, out

act out

1. Perform or portray something or someone, as in As she read to the class, the teacher had each child act out a different character in the story . [c. 1600]
2. Express unconscious feelings or impulses through one's behavior, without being aware of it. For example, She acted out her anger at her father by screaming at her husband. This meaning comes from 20th-century psychological theory and usually (but not always) refers to negative or hostile impulses and emotions. The term is sometimes used without an object to mean "misbehave" or "behave disruptively," as in The child is acting out in class. [First half of 1900s] In both usages, out means "openly" or "publicly."
See also: act, out

act out

v.
1. To communicate something through actions rather than words: In a game of charades, you describe words by acting them out. One comedian acted out simple phrases, and the other one tried to guess what they were.
2. To play some role: The first graders acted out the roles of the villagers in the school play.
3. To fulfill some role: Though they no longer trusted him, they continued to act out their parts as good wife and daughter.
4. To express some feeling or emotion behaviorally, especially unconsciously: I understand why you're angry, but I don't like the way you're acting out your aggression toward me.
5. To demonstrate bad behavior or negative feelings: The student was upset after losing the game and began to act out in class.
See also: act, out