acquiesce to

acquiesce to

To yield or succumb to one's requests or demands. After a long negotiation, the company acquiesced to the union's demands. I don't want to relocate, and my husband finally acquiesced to my wishes.

acquiesce to someone or something

to give in to someone or someone's wishes; to agree, perhaps reluctantly, to someone's ideas or requests. We are willing to acquiesce to your demands.
References in periodicals archive ?
By: Egypt Today staff CAIRO -- 2 July 2017: Former head of Dubai's General Security, Dhahi Khalfan, hinted that another emir will take over in Qatar in the case that current ruler Tamim bin Hamad's regime does not acquiesce to the demands of Arab countries on July 3, in a statement via his official Twitter account on Saturday.
My fear is that this necessity [subsidized manufacturing] won't become apparent to most Americans; that we will acquiesce to manufacturing's shrunken role in the American economy, just as we gradually acquiesced to frequent large-scale layoffs in the late twentieth century.
Israel will not acquiesce to the continued smuggling of arms," the Israeli daily Haaretz daily quoted the Israeli security cabinet.
To do anything less is to acquiesce to a system that does not value our contribution to the health services within NSW and sets up an untenable role model for new graduates to follow.
I also agree that Gordon Brown should let his Christian credentials inform his leadership style, rather than acquiesce to every whim and fad that has infiltrated our communities under the Trojan horse of political correctness.
Religious organizations got many of these breaks by lobbying for them, and The Times quoted experts who pointed out that in most cases, Congress and state lawmakers were only too happy to acquiesce to the demands of lobbyists representing religious interests.
As the common citizens of Europe sit aghast, their elected representatives acquiesce to the unelected elites at the EU overturning their countries' laws, against the people's wishes.
This professional approach does not, however, mean that you should acquiesce to the coach.
Bottom line: When the NFL does arrive - whether it's next week or in 2050, just as we're capturing Reggie the Alligator and getting the car-pool lane on the 405 - the league must acquiesce to us.
We're saying we're not going to argue--we're going to acquiesce to their point of view, and we're not supposed to say anything more.
Why should Americans have to acquiesce to foreign cultural standards they find demeaning, offensive, stupid or dangerous without some reciprocal arrangement with guests who visit these shores?
Buried in the middle of the book, at the end of the third chapter, is the sentence Cruz should have used to end this masterful survey: "We postmodern critics may opt either to distance ourselves from and dismiss the social problems engaged by the picaresque novel through the picaro's buffoonish acts, or to acknowledge and acquiesce to its social purpose" (115).
Yet, "women still acquiesce to someone, maybe their bosses or their husbands.
Cited frequently enough, revenue agents will very likely assert the proposition as though it were a settled rule of law and taxpayers may acquiesce to that view.