abide

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abide by a decision

To accept, follow, and comply with a decision, especially that which is handed down by a judge. Though it stings my dignity, I have to abide by the court's decision to not allow me to drive a car for the next 12 months.
See also: abide, by, decision

abide by

To obey something, usually an established rule. Because Donna refuses to abide by her parents' rules, I worry that she'll be told to move out of their house.
See also: abide, by

abide with

To stay or remain with someone. If you would like to rest for a while, you can abide with me.
See also: abide

abide by something

to follow the rules of something; to obey someone's orders. John felt that he had to abide by his father's wishes.
See also: abide, by

abide with someone

to remain with someone; to stay with someone. (Old and stilted. Primarily heard in the church hymn Eventide.) You are welcome to abide with me for a while, young man.
See also: abide

can't stand (the sight of) someone or something

 and can't stomach someone or something
Fig. [to be] unable to tolerate someone or something; disliking someone or something extremely. (Also with cannot.) I can't stand the sight of cooked carrots. Mr. Jones can't stomach the sight of blood. None of us can stand this place. Nobody can stand Tom when he smokes a cigar.
See also: stand

abide by

Accept and act in accordance with a decision or set of rules; also, remain faithful to. For example, All members must agree to abide by the club regulations, or A trustworthy man abides by his word. An older sense of the verb abide, "remain," is still familiar in the well-known 19th-century hymn "Abide with Me," which asks God to stay with the singer in time of trouble. [Early 1500s]
See also: abide, by

can't stand

Also, can't abide or bear or stomach . Thoroughly dislike; be unable to put up with something or someone. For example, I can't stand the sight of her; she's obnoxious, or I can't bear to leave the country, or I can't stomach a filthy kitchen. The oldest of these synonymous expressions is can't abide, which Shakespeare used in 2 Henry IV (3:2): "She could not abide Master Shallow." Can't stand dates from the early 1600; can't bear dates from about 1700 and often but not always is used with an infinitive; can't stomach dates from the late 1600s and today is less common than the others.
See also: stand

abide by

To conform to; comply with: abide by the rules.
See also: abide, by