a wake-up call

a wake-up call

  (American & Australian)
an event that warns someone that they need to deal with an urgent or dangerous problem (often + to do sth) The 1971 earthquake was a wake-up call to strengthen the city's bridges. (often + to ) The World Trade Center bombing has served as a wake-up call to the FBI on terrorism.
See also: call
References in periodicals archive ?
this past August was a wake-up call to organizations of all sizes that solid data protection processes must be in place, not only to survive these events, but also to maintain a competitive advantage.
The move/demotion to the offensive line was a wake-up call, and Hopkins responded.
The economic slowdown also services as a wake-up call to owners of designated Class B and C properties.
Many new issues posted only moderate gains or closed below their offering prices, sounding a wake-up call for option-seeking dot-com workers, who were forced to shed their rose-colored glasses and face the harsh, but undeniable, truth: No dot-com, no matter how promising, is certain to succeed.
It was a wake-up call for a once-complacent industry.
BUSINESS WIRE)--May 30, 1996--The Information Technology Association of America (ITAA) registered its endorsement of "Cryptography's Role in Securing the Information Society," a major report released today by the National Research Council (NRC), and said the Clinton Administration should view the comprehensive study as a wake-up call on its fundamentally flawed encryption policy.
This is a wake-up call for the voters of Los Angeles County.
After one too many close calls (a murder acquittal in 1996, a marijuana bust in 1998 and a wake-up call in 1997 after Tupac Shakur and the Notorious B.
It was a wake-up call to employers who want to downsize and continue doing all these negative things.