a trick worth two of that

a trick worth two of (something)

obsolete A plan, idea, or suggestion that is vastly superior to another one. Originally from Henry IV, Part I by Shakespeare and then used later by Rudyard Kipling. John has inherited a cabin upon a plot of land from his great uncle, but he did not simply retire there in his old age—he knew a trick worth two of that. Instead, he bulldozed the cabin and leased the land to local farmers, earning himself a pretty penny in the process.
See also: of, trick, two, worth

a trick worth two of that

a much better plan or expedient. informal
This phrase is from Shakespeare 's Henry the Fourth, Part 1: ‘I know a trick worth two of that i' faith’.
See also: of, that, trick, two, worth