a thumbnail sketch

a thumbnail sketch

a brief or small picture or description. The manager gave a thumbnail sketch of her plans. The student wrote a thumbnail sketch of his project.
See also: sketch, thumbnail
References in periodicals archive ?
Written by award winning children's author Donna McDine, "Powder Monkey" is a thumbnail sketch of the impressment experience of 12-year-old Tommy Kitt who was taken by force with his older brother from his parents' farm by a Royal Navy press gang to serve as a powder monkey and ship boy in a battleship at sea.
Cohen, a teacher and writer specializing in philosophy, provides a thumbnail sketch of the major ideas of each person, along with salacious stories about their private lives.
Paul, Minnesota which has a thumbnail sketch of the famous comic artist, born in St.
Johnson's Washington gives general readers, students, and scholars a thumbnail sketch of our first president.
He described it as having pokey holes and drew a thumbnail sketch.
I wish I could provide more than a thumbnail sketch, but you'll get the idea.
A valuable feature of this book is the "Editor's Note" at the beginning of each debate, which serves as a thumbnail sketch introducing each selection.
A thumbnail sketch of Irish civil servants as friendly, laid back but very astute is patronising indeed.
The following profiles give a thumbnail sketch of how multimedia hardware and software are being used in three districts around the country.
THE Sunday Mercury article 'Breeding ground for fanatics' - a thumbnail sketch of Birmingham's Muslim youth - presented a false image of the whole by focusing only on a tiny part of this community.
This is a thumbnail sketch of Randolph Trumbach's first volume of an ambitious and sustained exploration of sexuality in eighteenth-century London.
So his method of contending with the issues in his book, while incorporating statistics where appropriate, is to give a thumbnail sketch of an individual's theories (Foucault, Derrida, Bloom, deMan -- you name it) that is marvelously clear, and then to show how someone else took a bit from here, a bit from there, and moved "forward" (though the reader is often left wondering about the direction, as Kernan wishes).
In his book The Moral Animal, Robert Wright provides a thumbnail sketch of how this process might work:
Develop a thumbnail sketch of the company, including its business, its industry, its size and the names of key officers.
We presented the government with a thumbnail sketch of what the new corporation could be and we wanted $2-million to flesh this out.