a hatchet job

a hatchet job

  (informal)
strong and unfair criticism of someone or something, especially on television or in a newspaper She did a real hatchet job on his latest novel in one of the Sunday papers.
See also: hatchet, job
References in periodicals archive ?
Gillen was responding to comments made by Haughey's daughter Eimear, who described RTE's three-part series as a hatchet job last month.
JEB BRADLEY: He'd probably prefer a hatchet job than the snub he received at the hands of the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard Metal Trades Council, which endorsed his increasingly pesky opponent, Carol Shea-Porter.
The Story of Martha Stewart'' isn't a hatchet job - more one done with a Wusthof-Trident filleting knife.
Channel 4, though, blatantly tried to do a hatchet job on the 35-year-old - and failed miserably.
In last month's issue, the publication reprinted a hatchet job on the Girl Scouts that originally appeared in the National Review.
In each case, the videotape will be stored in a safe-deposit box or vault for use in court should the dentist do a hatchet job on the lower molars, the mechanic lie about replacing the clutch, the dry cleaner spill beer all over the mink stole, the tofu saag with chulcha paratha on the side cause hepatitis, or the hotel in Antigua turn out to be rat-infested.
David Garfinkle, executive producer, disavows the nonsense the show traded in, saying: ``It could have been a hatchet job.
IT'S great news that Lord Simpson has been kicked out of Marconi and can no longer do a hatchet job on the company.
Deposed Ireland team boss, Murray Kidd, who was involved at the initial stages of the tour's planning, refused to do a hatchet job on his successor, Ashton.
John McCain, Ted Koppell tried his best to do a hatchet job on McCain.