a domino effect

a domino effect

the effect which a situation or event has on a series of other situations or events
Usage notes: Dominoes are a set of small, rectangle-shaped pieces of wood or plastic, marked with spots on one side. If dominoes are placed standing next to each other, each one will knock the next one over.
Young people can't afford even the small houses, so the people in those houses can't move on to the bigger houses. It's the domino effect.
See also: domino, effect
References in periodicals archive ?
Agnelli said a domino effect could result if John Kerry is appointed by President Obama to one of the cabinet positions that are already open or will open in January at the beginning of the president's new four-year term.
The collapse of Greece and its exit from the euro would have a domino effect, she told German radio.
Because we would soon have a domino effect," said the chancellor.
Clausen's decision likely will have a domino effect across the country.
It'll also have a domino effect at Oaks Christian, where at least seven other seniors are expected to accept Division I scholarships.
Industry after industry is reporting lower sales and, in turn, placing fewer orders, impacting their suppliers in a domino effect that begins and ends with the American consumer.