black out

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black out

1. verb To lose consciousness. My blood sugar dropped so low during the meeting that I blacked out and woke up on the floor.
2. verb To experience a period of time about which one does not remember anything, despite having been fully conscious at the time (as during a stressful or traumatic event.) It's like I blacked out during the interview—I don't remember anything I said!
3. verb To avoid thinking about or remembering something, often because it is stressful or traumatic. Many trauma victims try to black out the horrific things that have happened to them.
4. verb To prevent something from being broadcast or disseminated, usually in a specific geographic area. Ugh, the game must be blacked out tonight. Is it on any other channel? The dictator has blacked out news from the rest of the world.
5. verb To cover something (usually with black lines or blocks) so that it cannot be seen or read. Be sure to black out all the other names on this list before you put it in the employee's file. The newspaper blacked out part of the photograph.
6. noun An episode of unconsciousness. Often written as one word ("blackout"). My blood sugar dropped so low that I had a blackout during the meeting and woke up on the floor.
7. noun A period of literal darkness caused by the loss of electricity, as during a storm. Often written as one word ("blackout"). We read by candlelight to pass the time during the blackout.
8. adjective slang Extremely drunk, often to the eventual point of unconsciousness. Often written as one word ("blackout"). He was blackout last night, so I'm not surprised that he doesn't remember talking to you.
See also: black, out

black something out

 
1. Lit. to cut or turn out the lights or electric power. The lightning strike blacked the entire town out. The manager blacked out the whole building during the emergency to prevent an explosion.
2. Fig. to prevent the broadcast of a specific television or radio program in a specific area. Will they black the game out around here? They blacked out the basketball game in this area.
See also: black, out

black out

 
1. Lit. [for lights] to go out. Suddenly the lights blacked out. The power went dead and everything blacked out from the heat.
2. Fig. to pass out; to become unconscious. After I fell, I must have blacked out. I think I am going to black out.
See also: black, out

black out

1. Obliterate with black, as in crossing out words on a page or print on a screen. For example, They have blacked out all the obscene words in the subtitles to make this movie suitable for youngsters . This usage may be derived from an earlier meaning, "to stain or defame," which dates from the 15th century (and probably alludes to "blackening" a person's reputation). [Mid-1800s]
2. Extinguish all lights. For example, The whole town was asleep, as blacked out as London during the war. In the early 1900s this expression alluded to the lights in a theater, but from about 1940 on it meant darkening an entire city to hide it from enemy bombers.
3. Lose consciousness, faint; also, experience a temporary loss of memory. For example, I couldn't remember a single note of the music; I blacked out completely, or The accused man claims he blacked out after his first drink. This usage is thought to have originated with pilots, who sometimes fainted briefly when pulling out of a power dive. It soon was transferred to other losses of consciousness or memory. [c. 1940]
See also: black, out

black out

v.
1. To stop emitting light; go out: The traffic lights blacked out when the storm knocked down power lines.
2. To cause a failure of electrical power in some region: The strong winds blacked out much of the city.
3. To lose consciousness or memory temporarily: The patient felt very dizzy and blacked out for a few minutes.
4. To suppress some memory from the conscious mind: The refugees blacked out their wartime experiences.
5. To prohibit the broadcast or spread of something, especially by censorship: The government blacked out the news that was broadcast from enemy radio stations.
See also: black, out
References in periodicals archive ?
It makes no sense that nearly all of the Pacific Northwest is hit with a blackout policy due to granting a massive swath to the Mariners.
Sweeney explains to readers what a blackout is and the misconceptions associated with blackout such as heavy drinking when as he explains and as told through peoples stories, that some people experience blackouts on two glasses of wine.
Digital closed circuit TV systems are especially helpful in a blackout at assisting law enforcement catch unsuspecting looters and others participating in criminal activities because it can clearly identify an individual entering a building or identify an incident within the cameras' field of vision--a marked improvement over video tape recording systems, which at best provide a grainy and choppy photograph.
Many times when a blackout occurs and power is restored the surge is so great that the systems acquire significant damage.
How could such a blackout occur in the first place?
Had the systems not worked, "instead of a blackout for a couple of days, we would have had one for several months," says Jack Hawks, a vice president at the Electric Power Supply Association.
These requirements would help to ensure that such a blackout does not happen again.
Tax advisers should consider the new requirements if a client is contemplating a blackout period, to avoid the risk of incurring penalties.
We are ready to go into action in the event that there is a blackout.
If the number of signals exceeds the number of signs on hand or if traffic is unusually heavy during a blackout, sheriff's deputies and Sheriff's Department volunteers will be deployed.
Scott Young said the Santa Clarita sheriff's station had just a few minutes warning that a blackout was imminent.
But some residents didn't let a little thing like a blackout impinge on their fun.
These two systems will be part of Culver City's emergency safety program to assist in traffic control in the event of a blackout or other equipment or power failure.
At present, a water agency may request to be excluded from a blackout or to have electric service restored if necessary because of an emergency, such as firefighting.