a bird in the hand

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a bird in the hand

Something of some value that is already acquired. Taken from the proverb "a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush," which means that having something, even if it is a lesser quantity, is better than taking the chance of losing it in order to attain something else that seems more desirable. Stephen: "I enjoy dating Nicole, but I'd really like to ask Debbie to dinner." Mark: "If you do that, Nicole will break up with you. Don't forget that a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush."
See also: bird, hand

a bird in the hand

what you have or know is better than something you do not have or know Investors are focused on the bird in the hand, and not looking for new opportunities very much these days.
Usage notes: based on the full form, a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush, which is rarely used
Etymology: based on the idea that a person should catch one bird that is easy to catch rather than hoping to find more somewhere else
See also: bird, hand

A bird in the hand (is worth two in the bush).

something that you say which means it is better to keep what you have than to risk losing it by trying to get something better If I were you I'd accept the money they're offering. After all, a bird in the hand...
See also: bird, hand