a bird in the hand

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a bird in the hand

Something of some value that is already acquired. Taken from the proverb "a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush," which means that having something, even if it is a lesser quantity, is better than taking the chance of losing it in order to attain something else that seems more desirable. Stephen: "I enjoy dating Nicole, but I'd really like to ask Debbie to dinner." Mark: "If you do that, Nicole will break up with you. Don't forget that a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush."
See also: bird, hand

a bird in the hand

You say a bird in the hand to mean that it is better to keep what you already have than to try to get something better and risk having nothing at all. The question now is will Carmichael live to regret turning down such a lucrative offer? A bird in the hand ... Note: You can also use the phrase a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush. A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush, so holiday resorts will reward you for booking early.
See also: bird, hand