a Trojan horse

Trojan horse

1. Something that initially seems innocuous but is ultimately bad or malicious. A reference to the myth in which Ancient Greek soldiers hid inside a giant wooden horse in order to gain access to the city of Troy. That personable new hire turned out to be a Trojan horse—she stole our intellectual property and sold it to the competitor!
2. A computer program that appears to be useful or harmless but secretly installs malicious code or software onto the infected computer. We have malware on our computer because that game you downloaded turned out to be a Trojan horse.
See also: horse, Trojan

a Trojan horse

COMMON If you describe someone or something as a Trojan horse, you mean that they seem good or useful, but are really there to help something be harmed or destroyed in the future. Proposals for a golf course are now seen as a Trojan Horse for hotel and conference centres. This small reduction in the basic tax rate was merely a Trojan horse for the far more drastic cutting of the top rate from 70 to 28 per cent. Note: This refers to an ancient Greek story. The city of Troy was under siege from the Greeks. The Greeks built a large hollow wooden horse and left it secretly as a gift for the Trojans, who took it into the city. However, Greek soldiers were hiding inside the horse, and they were able to cause the destruction of the city.
See also: horse, Trojan

a Trojan horse

1 a person or device intended to undermine an enemy or bring about their downfall. 2 a program designed to breach the security of a computer system, especially by ostensibly functioning as part of a legitimate program, in order to erase, corrupt, or remove data.
In Greek mythology, the Trojan horse was a huge hollow wooden statue of a horse in which Greek soldiers concealed themselves in order secretly to enter and capture the city of Troy, an action which brought the ten-year siege of the city to an end.
See also: horse, Trojan
References in periodicals archive ?
I am concerned there is a Trojan Horse aspect to this.
A Trojan horse has been found in the wild masquerading as program for Mac OS X called "'PokerGame".
Details of a Trojan horse being sent out to e-mail addresses under the guise of a warning about a university rapist have been issued by SophosLabs, the Sophos network of virus, spyware and spam analysis centres.
It was during a famous matchup in 1973 that Notre Dame students rolled a Trojan horse onto the field - a visible rebuke to a Trojan force named for an ancient losing army.
Ron Paul of Texas, one of eight House Republicans who voted against the measure, says the legislation is a Trojan horse.
For a Trojan horse to spread, a user must "invite" the program onto his/her computer--for example, by opening an e-mail attachment or downloading and running a file from the Internet.
This is because a Trojan Horse is created not to be highly visible in its destructive action, but rather to remain undetected as long as possible while stealing data.
Typically, an individual e-mails a Trojan Horse to you--it does not e-mail itself--and it may arrive in the form of a joke program of software of some sort.
A Trojan Horse program is a malicious program that pretends to be a benign application; a Trojan Horse program purposefully does something the user does not expect.
A Trojan horse is a program concealing harmful code that usually makes a computer or network available to unauthorized users in an appealing or unsuspicious package.
So maybe it is not such a good idea to author a Trojan Horse.
The anti-AIDS drug AZT functions like a Trojan horse.
The primary danger of this worm is that once opened, it attaches a Trojan horse on the user's computer that makes the computer vulnerable to hackers.
Some members of the Apple Macintosh community have claimed that Leap-A is a Trojan horse, and not a virus or worm, because it requires user interaction (the user has to receive a file via iChat, and manually choose to open and run the file contained inside).
Details of a Trojan horse that interrupts adult websites with messages from the Koran have been revealed by SophosLabs, a network of spam, spyware and virus analysis centres for antivirus company Sophos.