you pays your money, and you takes your choice

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you pay your money, and you take your choice

When you buy something, you must accept the risk that it will not be what you wanted. I'm sorry to hear that the laptop you bought online doesn't work, but you pay your money and you take your choice.
See also: and, choice, pay, take

you pays your money, and you takes your choice

When you buy something, you must accept the risk that it will not be what you wanted. I'm sorry to hear that the laptop you bought online doesn't work, but you pays your money, and you takes your choice.
See also: and, choice, pay, take

you pays your money and you takes your choice

used to convey that there is little to choose between one alternative and another.
Both pays and takes are non-standard, colloquial forms, retained from the original version of the saying in a Punch joke of 1846 .
See also: and, choice, money, pay, take

you ˌpays your ˌmoney and you ˌtakes your ˈchoice

(saying) used to say that there is not much difference between two or more alternatives, so you should choose whichever you prefer: It’s hard to say which explanation is more likely; it’s more a matter of you pays your money and you takes your choice.
The unusual grammar in this idiom copies the speech of showmen at a fairground.
See also: and, choice, money, pay, take
References in periodicals archive ?
In the end, it's exactly like the street peddler said: "The way it works is, you pays your money and you takes your choice.
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