whale

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Related to Whales: Humpback Whales, Sperm Whales

like a beached whale

1. Completely stuck and unable to move or escape from the situation. Said especially of large objects or vehicles. Our van's wheels sunk in the mud, and we've been stuck here like a beached whale for over an hour!
2. potentially offensive Of a person, exceptionally large or obese. I love going to the beach, but I'm going to look like a beached whale in this swimsuit.
See also: beach, like, whale

a beached whale

potentially offensive An extremely large or obese person. I really need to start exercising again. I've turned into a beached whale!
See also: beach, whale

a whale of a (good) time

An exceptionally fun, exciting, or amusing experience. (Usually used in the phrase, "have a whale of a (good) time.") Gee, Samantha, I sure had a whale of a time at the dance with you last night. We should go out again sometime! Come out to our party this weekend, it's sure to be a whale of a good time!
See also: of, time, whale

whale tail

slang The waistband of a thong or G-string when it becomes visible above the waistline of the wearer's pants or skirt. I really don't like wearing thongs, because I'm always paranoid that I'll end up having a whale tail on display.
See also: tail, whale

every eel hopes to become a whale

A phrase highlighting one's ambition. Just like every eel hopes to become a whale, I dream of becoming the CEO one day.
See also: become, eel, every, hope, whale

have a whale of a time

Fig. to have an exciting or fun time; to have a big time. (Whale is a way of saying big.) We had a whale of a time at Sally's birthday party. Enjoy your vacation! I hope you have a whale of a time.
See also: have, of, time, whale

whale into (someone or an animal)

Fig. to attack or punish someone or an animal. Jimmy's dad really whaled into him. The sailor whaled into the dog.
See also: whale

whale the tar out of someone

Inf. to spank or beat someone. (See also beat the living daylights out of someone.) My father threatened to whale the tar out of me. I'll whale the tar out of you when we get home if you don't settle down.
See also: of, out, tar, whale

a whale of a something

(spoken)
1. an unusually good something Perry's done a whale of a job for us. We had a whale of a time, and we were sorry when we had to leave.
2. an unusually large something There's a whale of a difference between being a partner in a law firm and just being another lawyer.
See also: of, whale

a whale of a [bill/difference/problem etc.]

  (American & Australian)
a very large bill, difference, problem etc. Another thousand dollars would make a whale of a difference. We ran up a whale of a bill in the restaurant.
See also: of, whale

a whale of a [job/party/story etc.]

  (American & Australian)
a very good job, party, story etc. They've done a whale of a job renovating the building.
See also: of, whale

have a whale of a time

to enjoy yourself very much 'Did Sam enjoy himself at the party?' 'He had a whale of a time.'
See also: have, of, time, whale

whale away

Attack physically or verbally, as in Our boys whaled away at the enemy, or The talk-show host whaled away at the hostile critics. The word whale here does not allude to the ocean mammal, but means "flog" or "thrash." [Mid-1800s]
See also: away, whale

whale of a time

A very enjoyable experience, as in We had a whale of a time in Puerto Rico. This idiom alludes to the largest mammal to describe something very large and impressive. [Colloquial; early 1900s]
See also: of, time, whale

whale into

v.
To strike or attack something or someone forcefully: The batter whaled into the baseball. The politician whaled into the press for their inaccurate reporting.
See also: whale

whale on

v.
1. To strike or hit someone or something repeatedly and forcefully; thrash someone or something: The street gangs whaled on each other until someone called the police.
2. To criticize someone vehemently: Our boss whaled on all of us for missing the deadline.
See also: on, whale

(as) fat as a beached whale

phr. very, very fat. That dame is as fat as a beached whale.
See also: beach, fat, whale

fat as a beached whale

verb
See also: beach, fat, whale

have a whale of a time

tv. to have an exciting time; to have a big time. We had a whale of a time at your party.
See also: have, of, time, whale

whale

1. n. a very fat person. (Cruel.) Britney is getting to be such a whale.
2. n. a drunkard; a person with an enormous capacity for liquor. Arthur is getting to be a regular whale. What does he drink?
3. n. a high roller in a casino or similar gambling setting. We take good care of our whales, comping them with anything they ask for.

whale into someone/something

in. to attack someone or something. Jimmy’s dad really whaled into him.
See also: whale

whale on

mod. excellent. (Possibly confused with or in error for wailing.) We had a whale on time at Bob’s house.
See also: on, whale

whale the tar out of someone

tv. to spank or beat someone. (Sometimes said to a child.) My father threatened to whale the tar out of me.
See also: of, out, tar, whale
References in periodicals archive ?
Whale watching is now one of the top tourist attractions in Iceland, generating around [pounds sterling]10 million annually and attracting more than 220,000 tourists each year, proving that whales are worth far more to the Icelandic economy alive than dead.
However, Japan self awards its own whaling quota, and this year has allocated itself up to 935 Minke Whales and 50 Fin Whales to be caught and killed in the Antarctic.
Models of ancient extinct animals show how land-dwelling mammals evolved over millions of years to become the whales and dolphins we know today.
But after the wars, the demand for more whale oil sent the whalers to the far corners of the oceans, seeking the increasingly scarce whales that could be rendered for the oil.
Because migrating right whales travel through the Gulf of Maine in spring mad fall, reducing the area's lobster traps at those times would make the passage safer, says Worm.
Still, many right whales die from shipping and fishing activities every year.
Many whale species including blue, fin, right, sperm and humpback whales were hunted to the verge of extinction during the 19th and 20th centuries, and Norway and Japan played central roles in the destruction of Antarctica's once-bountiful whale populations.
More information on humpback whales and what you can do to help conservation efforts can be found at http://www.
Usually you'll see the flukes, but I've never seen one spout, and I have seen killer whales in pods, but not off a whale-watching boat,'' Lois says.
But Hermanus is also home to the Whale Caller, a man who has spent most of his 60-odd years communicating with the great mammals by imitating their songs with a horn made of kelp.
The real health problem is that some dolphin meat is being mislabeled as baleen whale meat," says Naomi A.
Starting this year, Japanese whalers in the North Pacific will catch 50 sei whales annually, in addition to 100 minke whales, 50 Bryde's and 10 sperm whales, the agency said.
Although some species are making a comeback, the biggest whales are on the U.
The permits required suspension of testing if whales behaved in unusual ways, such as repeated breaching or pectoral fin or tail slapping.
Some of whale meat products sold in Japan from last spring until early this year contained meat from endangered or protected whales, an international environmental protection group and researchers said Wednesday.