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Related to Wells: HG Wells
References in classic literature ?
This gaiety did not impose upon anybody, but they tried to look as if it did for his sake, and he got on very well till Mrs.
That same cloud was being watched by two good friends in the ruined ditch below the city wall, for Bagheera and Kaa, knowing well how dangerous the Monkey-People were in large numbers, did not wish to run any risks.
53} the writer evidently thought that green, growing wood might also be well seasoned.
Afterwards, my spirits began slowly to recover their tone; my appetite returned, and in a fortnight I was well.
Amid the thought of the fiery destruction that impended, the idea of the coolness of the well came over my soul like balm.
He headed straight for the shop, well knowing his privileges as a sacred beast, lowered his head, and puffed heavily along the line of baskets ere making his choice.
He saw you then at Lyme, and liked you so well as to be exceedingly pleased to meet with you again in Camden Place, as Miss Anne Elliot, and from that moment, I have no doubt, had a double motive in his visits there.
You've all got to put on masquerade things and very likely skates as well, though the prince says they don't go with it; but we don't care about that.
I hoped you would have him all the evening, as well as all dinner-time.
It was thus, Archer reflected, that New York managed its transitions: conspiring to ignore them till they were well over, and then, in all good faith, imagining that they had taken place in a preceding age.
Wells lifted her on the point of his puissant pen, and placed her at the angle of view from which the life she was leading and the society to which she clung appeared in its true relation to real human needs and worthy social structure, he effected a conversion and a conviction of sin comparable to the most sensational feats of General Booth or Gypsy Smith.
then the king's counselors, who are in number seven - Mademoiselle Stewart, Mademoiselle Wells, Mademoiselle Gwyn, Miss Orchay, Mademoiselle Zunga, Miss Davies, and the proud Countess of Castlemaine - will represent to the king that war costs a great deal of money; that it is better to give balls and suppers at Hampton Court than to equip ships of the line at Portsmouth and Greenwich.
We have wells, you know, but they're all well lighted, and a well lighted well cannot well be a dark well.
And instead of eleven dollars a ton for Rock Wells, I paid fifteen dollars that winter.
On this island the wells are situated, from which ships obtain water.