Vatican roulette

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Vatican roulette

n. the rhythm method of birth control. My parents lost at Vatican roulette, and I am the booby prize.
See also: roulette
References in periodicals archive ?
31 in the chapel of the Vatican City governor's palace.
org/article/pope-names-commission-inquiry-vatican-bank) the Associated Press , and most recently a senior Vatican official, Monsignor Nunzio Scarano, was being investigated for money-laundering.
Carbone (former aide to the powerful secretary general of Vatican II,
the only American woman who was an official observer at Vatican II (April 1987)
In one case, a cleric who complained was reportedly sent to Washington as papal envoy to get him out of the Vatican.
The site, rolled out first in English and Italian and then other languages, will be more news-based, bringing together onto one page the current disorganized web presence of Vatican media.
But it also manages ATMs inside Vatican City and the pension system for the Vatican's thousands of employees.
International financial organisations said it appeared the Vatican had taken a step in the right direction.
The statementadded that Pope Benedict XVI will issue Vatican legislation concerning the prevention of money laundering andthe financing of groups accused of terrorism offences.
The second change came with the retirement of American Cardinal Edmund Szoka, 78, as governor of Vatican City.
Despite expectations that the pope would approve a still harsher "instruction" that even celibate gay men be barred from the priesthood, this latest move from the Vatican comes as an unprovoked attack.
diplomatic ties with the Vatican date back to 1984, when the exchange was proposed by President Ronald W.
Most students of American Catholicism identify the Second Vatican Council (1962-1965) as a moment of profound transformation for the church.
One of the more vile takes on Eugenio Pacelli, the Vatican Secretary of State who became Pius XII on March 2, 1939, comes from Daniel Jonah Goldhagen in a long essay published in the New Republic (January 21, 2002).
It is not accustomed to working under pressure of tight deadlines, as it showed in late April, when all 13 American cardinals were summoned for a meeting with John Paul II and top Vatican officials to discuss the sexual-abuse crisis in the American church.