trial

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Related to Trials: trials and tribulations

bring (someone or something) to trial

To cause a case to be tried in court. I am determined to bring that man to trial for the crimes he's committed.
See also: bring, trial

stand trial

To be brought before a judge for a crime or misdeed. You're faced with some serious accusations, so yes, you're probably going to have to stand trial.
See also: stand, trial

on trial

1. Being tried in a court of law. The woman is on trial for using her children to steal from stores all over town.
2. As a test to examine someone's or something's worth or suitability. They let us take the steam cleaner home on trial with the promise of a full refund if we didn't like it. They gave me the job, but only on trial for the first week until I prove I'm up to snuff.
See also: on, trial

on a trial

Undergoing a probationary period of employment while one's suitability or worthiness is evaluated. I put a new girl on a trial; hopefully she ends up being reliable.
See also: on, trial

bring someone or something to trial

to bring a crime or a criminal into court for a trial. At last, the thugs were brought to trial. We brought the case to trial a week later.
See also: bring, trial

go to trial

[for a case] to go into court to be tried. When will this case go to trial? We go to trial next Monday.
See also: trial

on trial

 
1. [of someone] in a legal case before a judge. The criminal was on trial for over three months. lam not on trial. Don't treat me like that!
2. being tested; being examined or experimented with. The new strain of wheat is on trial in Kansas at the present time. The teaching method is on trial in the school system.
See also: on, trial

send someone or something up

 
1. Lit. to order someone to go upward to a higher level; to arrange for something to be taken upward to a higher level. I'll send up Gary. They are hungry on the tenth floor. Let's send some sandwiches up.
2. Fig. to parody or ridicule someone or something. Comedians love to send the president or some other famous person up. The comedian sent up the vice president.
See also: send, up

send someone up

Fig. to mock or ridicule, particularly by imitation. Last week, he sent the prime minister up. In his act, he sends up famous people.
See also: send, up

send up a trial balloon

to suggest something and see how people respond to it; to test public opinion. Mary had an excellent idea, but when we sent up a trial balloon, the response was very negative. Don't start the whole project without sending up a trial balloon.
See also: balloon, send, trial, up

stand trial

to be the accused person in a trial before a judge; to be on trial. He had to stand trial for perjury and obstruction of justice.
See also: stand, trial

trial and error

trying repeatedly for success. I finally found the right key after lots of trial and error. Sometimes trial and error is the only way to get something done.
See also: and, error, trial

trial balloon

a test of someone's or the public's reaction. It was just a trial balloon, and it didn't work. The trial balloon was a great success.
See also: balloon, trial

trials and tribulations

Cliché problems and tests of one's courage or perseverance. I suppose I have the normal trials and tribulations for a person of my background, but some days are just a little too much for me. I promise not to tell you of the trials and tribulations of my day if you promise not to tell me yours!
See also: and, trial, tribulation

on trial

1. In the process of being tried, especially in a court of law. For example, He would be put on trial for the murder of his wife. [Early 1700s]
2. As a test of something, on probation, as in They said we could take the vacuum cleaner on trial and return it if it was too noisy. [Early 1700s]
See also: on, trial

send up

1. Put in prison, as in He'll be sent up for at least ten years. [Mid-1800s]
2. Cause to rise, as in The emissions sent up by that factory are clearly poisonous. [Late 1500s]
3. Satirize, make a parody of, as in This playwright has a genius for sending up suburban life. [First half of 1900s]
4. send up a trial balloon. See trial balloon.
See also: send, up

trial and error

An attempt to accomplish something by trying various means until the correct one is found. for example, The only way to solve this problem is by trial and error. The error here alludes to the failed means or attempts, which are discarded until the right way is found. [c. 1800]
See also: and, error, trial

trial balloon

An idea or plan advanced tentatively to test public reaction, as in Let's send up a trial balloon for this new program before we commit ourselves. This expression alludes to sending up balloons to test weather conditions. [c. 1930]
See also: balloon, trial

trial by fire

A test of one's abilities to perform well under pressure, as in Finishing this buge list of chores in time for the wedding is really a trial by fire. This expression alludes to the medieval practice of determining a person's guilt by having them undergo an ordeal, such as walking barefoot through a fire.
See also: fire, trial

trials and tribulations

Tests of one's patience or endurance, as in She went through all the trials and tribulations of being admitted to law school only to find she couldn't afford to go . This redundant expression- trial and tribulation here both mean the same thing-is also used semi-humorously, as in Do you really want to hear about the trials and tribulations of my day at the office?
See also: and, trial, tribulation

float a trial balloon

mainly AMERICAN
COMMON If someone floats a trial balloon they suggest an idea or plan in order to see what people think about it. The administration has not officially released any details of the president's economic plan, although numerous trial balloons have been floated. Note: Other verbs can be used instead of float. Weeks ago, the Tories were flying a trial balloon about banning teacher strikes. Note: You can call an idea or suggestion that is made to test public opinion a trial balloon. The idea is nothing more than a trial balloon at this point. Note: Balloons were formerly used to find out about weather conditions.
See also: balloon, float, trial

a trial run

COMMON A trial run is something that you do to practise before you do it at a more important time. They will use their match with the highly-rated Saracens forwards on Wednesday as a trial run for what awaits them on February 26.
See also: run, trial

trial and error

the process of experimenting with various methods of doing something until you find the most successful.
See also: and, error, trial

trial by television (or the media)

discussion of a case or controversy on television or in the media involving or implying accusations against a particular person.
See also: trial

by ˌtrial and ˈerror

trying different ways of doing something until you find the right one: I didn’t know how to use the camera at first, so I had to learn by trial and error.
See also: and, error, trial

a ˌtrial ˈrun

a first try at doing something, to test it or for practice: Take the car for a trial run before you buy it.
See also: run, trial

ˌtrials and tribuˈlations

difficulties and troubles: The novel is about the trials and tribulations of adolescence.
See also: and, trial, tribulation

send up

v.
1. To send someone to jail: They sent the crook up for ten years. The cops busted the gang and sent up the leader.
2. To make a parody of someone or something: The comedian sends up contemporary culture. I'm not afraid to send myself up to make people laugh.
See also: send, up

trial balloon

n. a test of someone’s reaction. It was just a trial balloon, and it didn’t work.
See also: balloon, trial

on trial

In the process of being tried, as in a court of law.
See also: on, trial

trial by fire

A test of one's abilities, especially the ability to perform well under pressure.
See also: fire, trial
References in classic literature ?
John Macfarlane, introduced as evidence in the trial, says: "There is one Alan Stewart, a distant friend of the late Ardshiel's, who is in the French service, and came over in March last, as he said to some, in order to settle at home; to others, that he was to go soon back; and was, as I hear, the day that the murder was committed, seen not far from the place where it happened, and is not now to be seen; by which it is believed he was the actor.
There are many incidents given in the trial that point to Alan's fiery spirit and Highland quickness to take offence.
Had his modesty not refused the trial, he would have hit the wand as well I.
Those who know anything of human nature, will not hesitate to answer these questions in the affirmative; and will be at no loss to perceive, that by making the same persons judges in both cases, those who might happen to be the objects of prosecution would, in a great measure, be deprived of the double security intended them by a double trial.
Would it have been desirable to have composed the court for the trial of impeachments, of persons wholly distinct from the other departments of the government?
You others, therefore, who are stronger than I, make trial of the bow and get this contest settled.
It's a trial of one kitten," replied the Scarecrow; "but your manner is a trial to us all.
Batterbury gave me no chance of asking his advice after the trial.
It is needless to relate them here; they came out at his trial, and the revelation of his calmness in confronting them came near to saving his neck.
At the trial, and still with honest belief, several testified to having seen Ernest prepare to throw the bomb, and that it exploded prematurely.
So will the coroner's inquest certainly find it; and then you will be easily admitted to bail; and, though you must undergo the form of a trial, yet it is a trial which many men would stand for you for a shilling.
To-day, the 15th of January, is the day of the trial.
When the reading of the report was over, people moved about, and Levin met Sviazhsky, who invited him very pressingly to come that evening to a meeting of the Society of Agriculture, where a celebrated lecture was to be delivered, and Stepan Arkadyevitch, who had only just come from the races, and many other acquaintances; and Levin heard and uttered various criticisms on the meeting, on the new fantasia, and on a public trial.
We passed a few sad hours until eleven o'clock, when the trial was to commence.
At the very beginning of the trial Raskolnikov's mother fell ill.