punch in

(redirected from The Clock)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

punch (oneself or someone) in

To sign in at one's place of employment at the beginning of a shift or day of work. We'd like to remind all employees that they will not be paid for any work they've done before they punch in. Sarah's going to be a couple of minutes late, so she asked me to punch her in. I keep forgetting to munch myself in when I get into work.
See also: punch

punch in (something)

To input data (into something) using a keypad or keyboard. Let me just punch in the code for the alarm before we leave. I've been punching in numbers from the survey into a spreadsheet all morning. I keep forgetting to munch myself in when I get into work.
See also: punch

punch someone in something

to strike someone in some body part. Tony punched Nick in the side. Why didn't you punch that mean guy in the nose?
See also: punch

punch something in

to crush or smash something in. Who punched the cereal box in? Who punched in the cereal box?
See also: punch

punch in

to record one's arrival at one's workplace at a certain time. What time did you punch in? I punched in at the regular time.
See also: punch

punch in

1. Also, punch a or the clock . Check in at a job upon arrival, as in You have to punch in or you won't get paid, or In this office no one has to punch a clock. This usage alludes to the use of a time clock, which has a button an employee punches or strikes to record the time of arrival on a card. [1920s] Also see punch out, def. 1.
2. Keyboard data into a computer, as in He was careful about punching in all the payments. [Mid-1900s]
See also: punch

punch in

v.
1. To check in formally at a job upon arrival, especially by stamping the arrival time on a timecard: I punched in ten minutes late this morning and the company fired me.
2. To enter some data on a keypad or similar device: I punched in my access code and I was allowed through the door.
See also: punch
References in classic literature ?
The young man glanced at the clock again and frowned darkly.
Its pendulum swung to and fro with a dull, heavy, monotonous clang; and when the minute-hand made the circuit of the face, and the hour was to be stricken, there came from the brazen lungs of the clock a sound which was clear and loud and deep and exceedingly musical, but of so peculiar a note and emphasis that, at each lapse of an hour, the musicians of the orchestra were constrained to pause, momentarily, in their performance, to harken to the sound; and thus the waltzers perforce ceased their evolutions; and there was a brief disconcert of the whole gay company; and, while the chimes of the clock yet rang, it was observed that the giddiest grew pale, and the more aged and sedate passed their hands over their brows as if in confused revery or meditation.
Dorothy had already taken the clock key from the peg.
There is a belfry-man whose sole duty is to attend to it; but this duty is the most perfect of sinecures -- for the clock of Vondervotteimittis was never yet known to have anything the matter with it.
If I took up my position "under the shadow of Saint Paul's," say, at ten that night, I should arrive at the place of meeting with two hours to spare, before the last stroke of the clock marked the beginning of the new month.
Some years ago the clock in the tower of the mosque got out of order.
The first sound that told of life and movement revealed the mechanical movement of the clock.
But as the time went on, he manifested some anxiety and surprise, glancing at the clock more frequently and at the window less hopefully than before.
and the strokes of the clock, the strokes I can't count, keep striking in my head
I entered an empty lecture-room one day just before the clock struck.
Sabin lit another cigarette and glanced once more at the clock.
He consequently sprang up again, re-entered the office, with a turn of his finger set the clock right again, that it might not be perceived the next day that it had been put wrong, and certain from that time that he had a witness to prove his alibi, he ran downstairs and soon found himself in the street.
He suddenly observed, hung over the clock, a card which, upon inspection, proved to be a programme of the daily routine of the house.
Dantes, perceiving the affectionate eagerness of his father, responded by a look of grateful pleasure; while Mercedes glanced at the clock and made an expressive gesture to Edmond.
exclaimed the duke, who from time to time looked at the clock, the fingers of which seemed to move with sickening slowness.