take the mickey (out of someone or something)

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take the mickey (out of someone or something)

To tease, mock, or ridicule (someone or something); to joke or kid around (about someone or something). A variant of "take the piss (out of someone)." Primarily heard in UK, Ireland. If you are so serious-minded that you can't take the mickey out of yourself every once in a while, you're going to have a hard time enjoying most of life. It really hurt Steph's feelings to know that the group had been taking the mickey out of her that whole time. Brian was a bit of a troublesome student and tended to take the mickey whenever class began.
See also: mickey, of, someone, take

take the mickey

mainly BRITISH, INFORMAL
COMMON If you take the mickey out of someone or something, you tease them or make jokes about them in a way that causes them to seem ridiculous. He started taking the mickey out of Joe because he's bald. I didn't know whether Neville was taking the Mickey out of me or not. Hey, are you taking the mickey? Note: You can also say that someone or something takes the mick out of someone or something. He's created a comedy that takes the mick out of absentee fathers and selfish mothers. Note: When someone behaves like this, you can call their behaviour mickey-taking. You can also call an instance of it a mickey-take. Until puberty I was really quite plump and had to put up with all the mickey-taking that went with it. It was actually a big mickey-take. Note: This expression may be based on rhyming slang. `To take the Mickey Bliss' means `to take the piss', a very rude expression which means to tease or make fun of someone. `Piss' is a slang word for urine.
See also: mickey, take

take the mickey

tease or ridicule someone, especially in an unkind or persistent way. informal, chiefly British
The origin of this phrase is unknown; take (or extract ) the Michael is a humorously formal variant.
See also: mickey, take

take the ˈmickey/ˈmick (out of somebody/something)

(British English, informal) make fun of somebody/something: Are you taking the mickey?People are always trying to take the mickey out of him because of his funny accent.
See also: mick, mickey, take

take the mickey out of

Chiefly British
To tease or mock (someone).
See also: mickey, of, out, take
References in periodicals archive ?
The twosome, from TV's Live & Kicking morning show, enjoy taking the mickey out of the music scene and will be paying their own tribute to pop's divas.
POP diva LADY GAGA looked like she was taking the Mickey as she touched down in Australia yesterday.
His driving was not only dangerous, it was taking the mickey.
Even kooky Roisin has gotta be taking the Mickey with that customised kids' duvet cover
They did, but it was clear Agen were taking the mickey.
Talksport, Soccer AM and the papers were all at it on Saturday morning, taking the mickey out of all the FA Cup third-round cliches.
Sam says he was taking the mickey out of him most of the way around.
It'll do you good and all the money-grabbing big-wigs won't be taking the mickey out of you into the bargain
But is it not taking the mickey by asking us to believe a mental health advocate's dismissal had nothing to do with her raising concerns on live radio?
But her mates are just trying to wind you up and if you show them it's getting to you they'll keep taking the mickey.
Of course, not being keen on the pair beforehand has led to numerous 'friends' taking the mickey and I'm currently known as 'the worst judge since Jeffreys'.
They are all taking the mickey out of me and my new girlfriend is starting to get really hacked off.
The Asians were watching and started taking the mickey.
Watch out for the hilarious video, too, with Madonna taking the mickey out of herown sexy image.
After mercilessly taking the mickey out of celebs as he hosted the Golden Globe awards, comic Ricky Gervais poses on an LA hotel balcony in a pair of chat show star Ellen DeGeneres' golden undies.
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