swift

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Related to Swifts: chimney swifts

Life is short and time is swift.

Prov. You should enjoy life as much as possible, because it does not last very long. Jill: Want to go to the movies with me? Jane: Oh, I don't know; I should probably stay at work and finish a few things. Jill: Come on, Jane, life is short and time is swift.
See also: and, life, short, swift, time

*quick as a wink

 and *quick as a flash; *quick as (greased) lightning; *swift as lightning
very quickly. (*Also: as ~.) As quick as a wink, the thief took the lady's purse. I'll finish this work quick as a flash. Quick as greased lightning, the thief stole my wallet.
See also: quick, wink

swift and sure

fast and certain. (As with the flight of a well-aimed arrow.) The response of the governor to the criticism by the opposing party was swift and sure. The boxer's punch was swift and sure and resulted in a quick knockout and a very short match.
See also: and, sure, swift

*swift as an arrow

 and *swift as the wind; *swift as thought
very fast. (*Also: as ~.) The new intercity train is swift as an arrow. You won't have to wait for me long; I'll be there, swift as thought.
See also: arrow, swift

quick as a wink

Also, quick as a bunny or a flash . Very speedily, as in He was out of here quick as a wink, or She answered, quick as a bunny. These similes have largely replaced the earlier quick as lightning, although quick as a flash no doubt alludes to it (also see like greased lightning), and quick as thought, now obsolete. The bunny variant dates from the mid-1800s, the others from the late 1800s.
See also: quick, wink

swift

1. mod. smart and clever. Excuse my brother. He’s not too swift.
2. mod. sexually fast or easy, usually said of a woman. Britney is swift, they say, but I find her to be a perfect lady.
References in classic literature ?
With intervals between, Swift remained in Sir William's household for about five years.
As the years went on Swift found his position grow more and more irksome.
It was now that Swift wrote the two little books which first made him famous.
A Tale of a Tub like The Battle of the Books is a satire, and Swift wrote it to show up the abuses of the Church.
When Sir William Temple died Swift went back to Ireland, and after a little time he once more received a Church living there.
Sir William had left Swift some money; he had also left some to Esther Johnson, the little girl Swift used to teach.
The strange friendship between these two, between Esther Johnson and Swift, is one of the puzzles in Swift's life.
Swift called his girl-friend Stella, and as Stella she has become famous in our literature.
Draper's, Cloth-Merchant's] Letters,' in which Swift aroused the country to successful resistance against a very unprincipled piece of political jobbery whereby a certain Englishman was to be allowed to issue a debased copper coinage at enormous profit to himself but to the certain disaster of Ireland.
During these years Swift corresponded with friends in England, among them Pope, whom he bitterly urged to 'lash the world for his sake,' and he once or twice visited England in the hope, even then, of securing a place in the Church on the English side of St.
Swift, like Defoe, generally increases the verisimilitude of his fictions and his ironies by careful accuracy in details, which is sometimes arithmetically genuine, sometimes only a hoax.
STEELE AND ADDISON AND 'THE TATLER' AND 'THE SPECTATOR' The writings of Steele and Addison, of which the most important are their essays in 'The Tatler' and 'The Spectator,' contrast strongly with the work of Swift and are more broadly characteristic of the pseudo-classical period.
The Swifts hired an employee and embarked on a goal to capture all the Spokane transcription work that was being sent to out-of-state companies.
The Swifts and their employees designed time-off plans and benefits tailored to working mothers.