Sundays


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not in a month of Sundays

Not at any point; under absolutely no circumstances. Not in a month of Sundays did I think that I would actually win the lottery! A: "Do you think Samantha will agree to go on a date with Jake?" B: "Not in a month of Sundays!"
See also: month, not, of, Sundays

never in a month of Sundays

Not at any point; under absolutely no circumstances. Never in a month of Sundays did I think that I would actually win the lottery! A: "Do you think Samantha will agree to go on a date with Jake?" B: "Never in a month of Sundays!"
See also: month, never, of, Sundays

a month of Sundays

An impossible event used as an analogy for something the speaker thinks will never happen. You want to borrow my car? Oh, sure—in a month of Sundays! He is never going to graduate, not in a month of Sundays.
See also: month, of, Sundays

when two Sundays come together

Never. Usually said sarcastically. A: "When are you going to help me clean out the garage?" B: "How about when two Sundays come together?"
See also: come, Sundays, together, two

when two Sundays meet

Never. Usually said sarcastically. A: "When are you going to help me clean out the garage?" B: "How about when two Sundays meet?"
See also: meet, Sundays, two

in a month of Sundays

At any point; under any circumstances. Used in the negative to convey that something will never happen. Not in a month of Sundays did I think that I would actually win the lottery! A: "Do you think Samantha will agree to go on a date with Jake?" B: "Not in a month of Sundays!"
See also: month, of, Sundays

month of Sundays

An extremely long, often indefinite period of time. Often used in negative constructions, especially to mean "never." Wow, I haven't been to this part of town in a month of Sunday's. A: "Do you think Samantha will agree to go on a date with Jake?" B: "Not in a month of Sundays!" We'll be here for a month of Sunday's trying to sort through all this paperwork!
See also: month, of, Sundays

(I) haven't seen you in a month of Sundays.

Rur. I haven't seen you in a long time. Tom: Hi, Bill Haven't seen you in a month of Sundays! Bill: Hi, Tom. Long time no see. Bob: Well, Fred! Come right in! Haven't seen you in a month of Sundays! Fred: Good to see you, Uncle Bob.
See also: month, of, seen, Sundays

in a coon's age

 and in a month of Sundays
Rur. in a very long time. (The coon is a raccoon.) How are you? I haven't seen you in a coon's age. I haven't had a piece of apple pie this good in a coon's age.
See also: age

month of Sundays, a

A long time, as in I haven't seen Barbara in a month of Sundays. This expression, which would literally mean thirty weeks, has been used hyperbolically since it was first recorded in 1832. One writer suggests it originally connoted a long dreary time, since games and other kinds of amusement used to be forbidden on Sunday.
See also: month, of

not in a month of Sundays

or

never in a month of Sundays

If you say that something will not or will never happen in a month of Sundays, you mean it is very unlikely to happen. Their scheme will never work — not in a month of Sundays.
See also: month, not, of, Sundays

a month of Sundays

a very long, seemingly endless period of time.
This expression may be a reference to the traditionally slow passage of Sundays as a result of religious restrictions on activity or entertainment. In a letter written in 1849 , G. E. Jewsbury talked of the absence of mail deliveries on Sundays, remarking: ‘If I don't get a better letter from you…you may pass “a month of Sundays” at breakfast without any letter from me’.
1998 Country Life All in all, the Ministry of Agriculture is gaining the no-nonsense, get-your-coats-off atmosphere that Jack Cunningham could not have managed in a month of Sundays.
See also: month, of, Sundays

(not for/in) a ˌmonth of ˈSundays

(spoken) used to emphasize that something will never happen: ‘Do you think she’ll be able to sell the house at that price?’ ‘Not in a month of Sundays. It’s far too much.’
See also: month, of, Sundays

month of Sundays

Informal
An indefinitely long period of time: It will take you a month of Sundays to chop all that wood.
See also: month, of, Sundays
References in classic literature ?
If religion was good for anything," said Jones, "it would prevent your religious people from making us work on Sundays, as you know many of them do, and that's why I say religion is nothing but a sham; why, if it was not for the church and chapel-goers it would be hardly worth while our coming out on a Sunday.
Year in and year out, not a day's rest, and never a Sunday with my wife and children; and never able to go to a place of worship, which I had always been used to do before I took to the driving box.
Then she could have defied Davy, and gone to her beloved Sunday School.
After all, perhaps it would have been better to have gone to Sunday School and church.
Will you ride with me next Sunday, and we can talk it over thoroughly then and reach some sort of a conclusion.
It had a perennial fascination for us and we read it over every Sunday.
Jeremiah then says to me, "As to banns, next Sunday being the third time of asking (for I've put 'em up a fortnight), is my reason for naming Monday.
It was really touching to hear the melancholy tone in which she said 'On Sunday I mustn't play with my doll
Afterwards he found that the vague feeling of alarm had spread to the clients of the underground railway, and that the Sunday excursionists began to return from all over the South-Western "lung"--Barnes, Wimbledon, Richmond Park, Kew, and so forth--at unnaturally early hours; but not a soul had anything more than vague hearsay to tell of.
On a Sunday morning when he could not sleep because of his thoughts he arose and went to walk in the streets.
He resolved that when Sunday came he would pull himself together and answer Ruth's letter.
It brought to the minister a vivid realization of how those words would sound the next Sunday when he should utter them before his people in the sacred hush of the church.
Now, let me advise you to get a Sunday suit: there's Tookey, he's a poor creatur, but he's got my tailoring business, and some o' my money in it, and he shall make a suit at a low price, and give you trust, and then you can come to church, and be a bit neighbourly.
Thee't see her again o' Sunday afore she goes," were her first words.
Forthwith he grew proud and boastful: and, our raid with the Mary Rebecca on the Sunday salmon fishers having wrought fear in their hearts, he sent a challenge up to Benicia.