Sundays


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not in a month of Sundays

Not at any point; under absolutely no circumstances. Not in a month of Sundays did I think that I would actually win the lottery! John: "Do you think Samantha will agree to go on a date with Jake?" Tony: "Not in a month of Sundays!"
See also: month, not, of, Sundays

never in a month of Sundays

Not at any point; under absolutely no circumstances. Never in a month of Sundays did I think that I would actually win the lottery! John: "Do you think Samantha will agree to go on a date with Jake?" Tony: "Never in a month of Sundays!"
See also: month, never, of, Sundays

a month of Sundays

An impossible event used as an analogy for something the speaker thinks will never happen. You want to borrow my car? Oh, sure—in a month of Sundays! He is never going to graduate, not in a month of Sundays.
See also: month, of, Sundays

(I) haven't seen you in a month of Sundays.

Rur. I haven't seen you in a long time. Tom: Hi, Bill Haven't seen you in a month of Sundays! Bill: Hi, Tom. Long time no see. Bob: Well, Fred! Come right in! Haven't seen you in a month of Sundays! Fred: Good to see you, Uncle Bob.
See also: month, of, seen, Sundays

in a coon's age

 and in a month of Sundays
Rur. in a very long time. (The coon is a raccoon.) How are you? I haven't seen you in a coon's age. I haven't had a piece of apple pie this good in a coon's age.
See also: age

not in a month of Sundays

if you say that something will not happen in a month of Sundays, you mean that it is not likely to happen He'll never run the marathon, not in a month of Sundays.
See also: month, of, Sundays

month of Sundays, a

A long time, as in I haven't seen Barbara in a month of Sundays. This expression, which would literally mean thirty weeks, has been used hyperbolically since it was first recorded in 1832. One writer suggests it originally connoted a long dreary time, since games and other kinds of amusement used to be forbidden on Sunday.
See also: month, of

month of Sundays

Informal
An indefinitely long period of time: It will take you a month of Sundays to chop all that wood.
See also: month, of, Sundays
References in classic literature ?
The mysterious event caused much speculation at the church on the following Sunday.
These, however, were only the exceptions required to prove the rule that the sparrows in the plane-tree behind the house, and the echoes in the corner before it, had their own way from Sunday morning unto Saturday night.
Poyser was in his Sunday suit of drab, with a red-and-green waistcoat and a green watch-ribbon having a large cornelian seal attached, pendant like a plumb-line from that promontory where his watch-pocket was situated; a silk handkerchief of a yellow tone round his neck; and excellent grey ribbed stockings, knitted by Mrs.
Well, if you MUST say dreadful words don't say them on Sunday," pleaded Dora.
Well, all I know is, I shall never read Shakespeare on Sunday," said Felicity loftily.
Fifty thousand lairs surrounded him where people lived so unwholesomely that fair water put into their crowded rooms on Saturday night, would be corrupt on Sunday morning; albeit my lord, their county member, was amazed that they failed to sleep in company with their butcher's meat.
On a Sunday morning when he could not sleep because of his thoughts he arose and went to walk in the streets.
I lay abed and read and rested from my journey's fatigues the remainder of that Sunday, but I sent my agent to represent me at the afternoon service, for I never allow anything to interfere with my habit of attending church twice every Sunday.
Macey observed, later on in the evening at the Rainbow, that Marner's head was "all of a muddle", and that it was to be doubted if he ever knew when Sunday came round, which showed him a worse heathen than many a dog.
I have read, in another account of these events, that on Sunday morning "all London was electrified by the news from Woking.
I know it's not Saturday," Lady Muriel replied; "but isn't Sunday often called 'the Christian Sabbath'?
Price took her weekly walk on the ramparts every fine Sunday throughout the year, always going directly after morning service and staying till dinner-time.
The Sunday after Miss Bartlett's arrival was a glorious day, like most of the days of that year.
On the eleventh of July, which was Saturday, the manifesto was received but was not yet in print, and Pierre, who was at the Rostovs', promised to come to dinner next day, Sunday, and bring a copy of the manifesto and appeal, which he would obtain from Count Rostopchin.
Nevertheless, since the inward debate necessarily turned on Dorothea, he ended, as he had done before, only by getting a livelier sense of what her presence would be to him; and suddenly reflecting that the morrow would be Sunday, he determined to go to Lowick Church and see her.