strength

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inner strength

One's resolve or determination. You have to draw on your inner strength—it will carry you through an experience like this.
See also: inner, strength

pillar of strength

A supportive or emotionally strong person. My aunt has been a pillar of strength for me, helping me through many difficult moments in my life.
See also: of, pillar, strength

at full strength

At the maximum strength, capacity, or level of power or ability. Give her a dose of that painkiller at full strength. It took a while, but I'm finally back at full strength after my injury. Now that the army is at full strength, the smaller opposing side doesn't stand a chance.
See also: full, strength

by brute strength

By sheer force or physical strength. I couldn't get my car out of the mud until my brothers came along and moved it by brute strength.
See also: brute, strength

by main strength and awkwardness

By sheer force or physical strength. I couldn't get my car out of the mud until my brothers came along and moved it by main strength and awkwardness.

go from strength to strength

To become increasingly successful or improved. I was nervous when I initially invested in that company, but it has gone from strength to strength, thank goodness.
See also: strength

on the strength of (something)

Due to or on the basis of something. I can't help but feel like I was hired for my looks and not on the strength of my skills. On the strength of this new evidence, I find no reason for this case to proceed any further.
See also: of, on, strength

at full strength

at the strongest amount, dilution, power, loudness, etc. You should use this medicine at full strength, even if it tastes bad.
See also: full, strength

by brute strength

by great muscular strength. The men moved the heavy door by brute strength.
See also: brute, strength

by main strength and awkwardness

Rur. by force or brute strength. Tom: How did you get that piano up the stairs? Mary: By main strength and awkwardness. By main strength and awkwardness, we got all the luggage crammed into the car.

main strength and awkwardness

Fig. great force; brute force. They finally got the piano moved in to the living room by main strength and awkwardness. Lifting the antique table must be done carefully. This is not a job requiring main strength and awkwardness.

not know one's own strength

not to realize how destructive or harmful one's strength can be. I didn't mean to hurt you. I guess I don't know my own strength. He might break the door down by accident. He doesn't know his own strength and could end up pushing too hard against the door.
See also: know, not, own, strength

on the strength of something

Fig. because of the support of something, such as a promise or evidence; due to something. On the strength of your comment, I decided to give John another chance. On the strength of my testimony, my case was dismissed.
See also: of, on, strength

pillar of strength

 and pillar of support
someone or something that consistently provides moral, emotional, or financial support as does a pillar. My parents are my pillars of support. John looked to God as his pillar of strength.
See also: of, pillar, strength

tower of strength

Fig. a person who can always be depended on to provide support and encouragement, especially in times of trouble. Mary was a tower of strength when Jean was in the hospital. She looked after her whole family. Jack was a tower of strength during the time that his father was unemployed.
See also: of, strength, tower

Union is strength.

Prov. If people join together, they are more powerful than if they work by themselves. The students decided to join together in order to present their grievances to the faculty, since union is strength. We cannot allow our opponents to divide us. Union is strength.
See also: strength, union

brute force

Also, brute strength. Savage violence, unreasoning strength, as in We hope that reason will triumph over brute force. Although this expression is also used literally to mean exceptional physical power, the figurative sense reflects the origin for brute, which comes from Latin brutus, for "heavy, stupid, unreasoning." [First half of 1700s]
See also: brute, force

on the strength of

On the basis of, as in She was hired on the strength of her computer skills. [Early 1600s]
See also: of, on, strength

tower of strength

A dependable person on whom one can lean in time of trouble, as in After Dad died Grandma was a tower of strength for the whole family. This expression, first recorded in 1549, originally was used most often to refer to God and heaven, but Shakespeare had it differently in Richard III (5:3): "Besides, the King's name is a tower of strength."
See also: of, strength, tower

go from strength to strength

COMMON If a person, organization or event goes from strength to strength, they become more and more successful or confident. As for James, he's still going from strength to strength in the army. A decade later, the company has gone from strength to strength.
See also: strength

a tower of strength

or

a pillar of strength

COMMON If someone is a tower of strength or a pillar of strength during a difficult period in your life, they give you a lot of help or support. My eldest daughter was a tower of strength for me when I was sick. In her terrible sadness she has found Charles to be a pillar of strength.
See also: of, strength, tower

give me strength!

used as an expression of exasperation or annoyance.
See also: give

go from strength to strength

develop or progress with increasing success.
See also: strength

on the strength of

on the basis of or with the justification of.
See also: of, on, strength

a tower (or pillar) of strength

a person who can be relied upon to be a source of strong support and comfort.
This phrase may come from the Book of Common Prayer: ‘O Lord…be unto them a tower of strength’.
See also: of, strength, tower

in ˈforce/ˈstrength

(of people) present in large numbers: The police were out in force to deal with any trouble at the demonstration.Party members appeared in strength to welcome the Prime Minister.
See also: force, strength

be at/below full ˈstrength

have/not have the necessary number of people to do something: We’re working below strength at the moment; it’s not easy to deliver all the orders on time.When we’re working at full strength, we employ 600 people.
See also: below, full, strength

go from ˌstrength to ˈstrength

have more and more success: Since she became the boss, the company’s gone from strength to strength.
See also: strength

on the strength of something

mainly because of something: I got the job on the strength of my experience in sales.They were sent to prison on the strength of a tiny piece of evidence.
See also: of, on, something, strength

a ˌpillar/ˌtower of ˈstrength

a person who gives you the courage and determination to continue when you are in a bad situation: My wife has been a tower of strength during my illness.During your five years in prison, Terry was a pillar of strength.
See also: of, pillar, strength, tower

play to your ˈstrengths

give your attention and effort to things that you do well; give somebody the opportunity to do this: Each member of the team should have a task that plays to their strengths.
See also: play, strength

on the strength of

On the basis of: She was hired on the strength of her computer skills.
See also: of, on, strength
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