station

(redirected from Stations)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Stations: Stations of the Cross, Statins, Police stations, Radio stations

marry above (one's) station

To marry someone who is of a higher social class or standing than oneself. A: "I hear that the local fishmonger's daughter is betrothed to a rich foreign lawyer!" B: "My word, she's certainly marrying above her station, isn't she?" For all the talk that social classes have been wiped away in recent years, you will still find people who believe one can't or shouldn't marry above one's station.
See also: above, marry, station

*busy as a beaver (building a new dam)

 and *busy as a bee; *busy as a one-armed paperhanger; *busy as Grand Central Station; *busy as a cat on a hot tin roof; *busy as a fish peddler in Lent; *busy as a cranberry merchant (at Thanksgiving); *busy as popcorn on a skillet
very busy. (*Also: as ~.) My boss keeps me as busy as a one-armed paperhanger. I don't have time to talk to you. I'm as busy as a beaver. When the tourist season starts, this store is busy as Grand Central Station. Sorry I can't go to lunch with you. I'm as busy as a beaver building a new dam. Prying into other folks' business kept him busy as popcorn on a skillet.
See also: beaver, busy

station someone at something

to position or place someone near something. The manager stationed a receptionist at the door. Would you station a guard at the back door to keep people out?
See also: station

marry beneath your station

  (old-fashioned)
to marry someone who belongs to a lower social class than you Her father, who felt that she had married beneath her station, refused to speak to her.
See also: beneath, marry, station

panic stations

  (British & Australian informal)
a time when you feel extremely anxious and you must act quickly because something needs to be done urgently No matter how organized you think you are, one hour before the show starts it's panic stations.
See also: panic, station

busy as a beaver

Also, busy as a bee. Hardworking, very industrious, as in With all her activities, Sue is always busy as a bee, or Bob's busy as a beaver trying to finish painting before it rains. The comparison to beavers dates from the late 1700s, the variant from the late 1300s. Also see eager beaver; work like a beaver.
See also: beaver, busy

comfort station

1. n. a restroom; toilet facilities available to the public. (Euphemistic.) We need to stop and find a comfort station in the next town.
2. n. an establishment that sells liquor. Let’s get some belch at a comfort station along here somewhere.
See also: comfort, station

filling station

n. a liquor store. (From an old name for an automobile service station.) Please stop at the filling station and get some suds on your way home.
See also: filling, station

fuzz station

n. a police station. He had to spend about an hour at the fuzz station, but nothing happened to him.
See also: fuzz, station

Grand Central Station

n. any busy and hectic place. (From Grand Central Station in New York City—a very busy place.) At just about closing time, this place becomes Grand Central Station.
See also: central, grand, station

thirst-aid station

n. a place to purchase liquor. (Punning on first-aid station.) Let’s stop at the next thirst-aid station and get a snort.
See also: station
References in classic literature ?
The two men watched the steamer round the bend, then, ascending arm in arm the slope of the bank, returned to the station.
In reply to that objection, I would beg to ask what their station is.
Phileas Fogg and his servant seated themselves in a first-class carriage at twenty minutes before nine; five minutes later the whistle screamed, and the train slowly glided out of the station.
I failed to find Lord Hilton at his house, but I was told he was expected from London by the six o'clock train from Waterloo; and as it was then about a quarter past five, I went home, had some tea, and walked up to the station to waylay him.
Meanwhile the carriage had worked its way out of the coil about the station, and they were crawling down the slippery incline to the wharf, menaced by swaying coal-carts, bewildered horses, dishevelled express-wagons, and an empty hearse--ah, that hearse
They came to the station, and he went to the booking-office.
Therefore, if the shop existed and if this object were really in the window, it would prove that he had been able to concentrate his attention on this article at a moment when, as a general rule, his absence of mind would have been too great to admit of any such concentration; in fact, very shortly after he had left the railway station in such a state of agitation.
He had begun to think of the last station and was still pondering on the same question- one so important that he took no notice of what went on around him.
It rained heavily all the way to Bright River, to which station they had to go, since the branch line train from Carmody did not connect with the boat train.
Having satisfied himself at length upon this point, he made his way to the London and North Western Railway Station, and knocked at the door of the station-master's office.
He volunteered to make immediate inquiries at the railway station.
He started up, and saw the pony-chaise approaching him along the road from the station.
I didn't want any more loitering in the shade, and I made haste towards the station.
The station for Howards End was at Hilton, one of the large villages that are strung so frequently along the North Road, and that owe their size to the traffic of coaching and pre-coaching days.
There were very few people upon Platform Number Twenty-one of Liverpool Street Station at a quarter to nine on the evening of April 2 - possibly because the platform in question is one of the most remote and least used in the great terminus.