standard

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double standard

1. Any set of values or principles that are applied differently and unequally to two or more similar people, groups, or situations. The prime minster was accused of engaging in a double standard regarding his foreign policy, supporting extremism in countries long regarded as allies while decrying the same kind of extremism elsewhere.
2. An unwritten provision granting more sexual freedom to men than to women. The double standard that young men are encouraged to be sexually active while young women may be ostracized for it is still a hugely pervasive problem for many young people growing up today.
See also: double, standard

gold standard

1. Literally, a monetary standard where a currency's value is defined by an existing and fixed amount of gold. There are many who believe that the country should return to the gold standard for a more secure means of issuing currency.
2. By extension, a well-established and widely accepted model or paradigm of excellence by which similar things are judged or measured. Her research methodology in the late 1960s has since become the gold standard for drug trials today.
See also: gold, standard

new standard

A newly-adopted benchmark or measure; a new way of judging something. High unemployment rates have become the new standard due to the country's economic strife.
See also: new, standard

standard fare

A common occurrence. Smashed instruments are standard fare at a rock concert. Arguments are standard fare for the Smith family at Thanksgiving, believe me.
See also: fare, standard

standard-bearer

1. A military member who carries the flag of their unit. The soldier marched proudly, flag in hand, as the standard-bearer of his unit.
2. The widely-accepted leader of a cause, movement, or ideology. She rose above her contemporaries to become the standard-bearer of the women's rights movement.

bog standard

slang Conventional. I just need a bog standard phone—nothing fancy.
See also: bog, standard

come up to standards

To improve someone or something enough to meet a certain requirement or expectation. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. If your intern doesn't come up to standards, expect him to be fired.
See also: come, standard, up

come up to someone's standards

to meet or be equal to someone's standards or requirements. Does this ice cream come up to your standards? Ann's concert recital did not come up to her own standards.
See also: come, standard, up

double standard

A set of principles establishing different provisions for one group than another; also, specifically, allowing men more sexual freedom than women. For example, She complained that her father had a double standard-her brothers were allowed to date, but she was not, even though she was older . [Mid-1900s]
See also: double, standard

the standard bearer

COMMON The standard bearer of a group of people or a belief is a person who represents them. He saw himself as the standard bearer of the right of the party. She's become very much the standard bearer for traditional, family values. Note: A standard is a flag with badges or symbols on it, which represent a person or organization. In the past, a standard bearer was the person who led an army into battle carrying a standard.
See also: bearer, standard
References in classic literature ?
Two hundred heavily-armed cavalry rode behind the Audley standard, while close at their heels came the Duke of Lancaster with a glittering train, heralds tabarded with the royal arms riding three deep upon cream-colored chargers in front of him.
Don Quixote, putting up his visor, advanced with an easy bearing and demeanour to the standard with the ass, and all the chief men of the army gathered round him to look at him, staring at him with the usual amazement that everybody felt on seeing him for the first time.
Between the mother, with her fast-perishing lumber of superstitions, folk-lore, dialect, and orally transmitted ballads, and the daughter, with her trained National teachings and Standard knowledge under an infinitely Revised Code, there was a gap of two hundred years as ordinarily understood.
Elizabethan prose, all too chaotic in the beauty and force which overflowed into it from Elizabethan poetry, and incorrect with an incorrectness which leaves it scarcely legitimate prose at all: then, in reaction against that, the correctness of Dryden, and his followers through the eighteenth century, determining the standard of a prose in the proper sense, not inferior to the prose of the Augustan age in Latin, or of the "great age in France": and, again in reaction against this, the wild mixture of poetry and prose, in our wild nineteenth century, under the influence of such writers as Dickens and Carlyle: such are the three periods into which the story of our prose literature divides itself.
They played the National air called "The Oz Spangled Banner," and behind them were the standard bearers with the Royal flag.
War was again proclaimed, however, and when the trumpet summoned him to his standard, the Soldier put on his charger its military trappings, and mounted, being clad in his heavy coat of mail.
The moment of this culminating horror was eleven o'clock and twenty- five minutes, standard time.
Grecian and will not be defined in this standard English dictionary.
As I succeeded with my writing, my standard of living rose and my horizon broadened.
Doesn't the Standard Oil Trust* own a score of the ocean lines?
Standard Oil and Rockefeller--see upcoming footnote: "Rockefeller began as a member .
Rockefeller began as a member of the proletariat, and through thrift and cunning succeeded in developing the first perfect trust, namely that known as Standard Oil.
When a race of plants is once pretty well established, the seed-raisers do not pick out the best plants, but merely go over their seed-beds, and pull up the 'rogues,' as they call the plants that deviate from the proper standard.
If it has taken centuries or thousands of years to improve or modify most of our plants up to their present standard of usefulness to man, we can understand how it is that neither Australia, the Cape of Good Hope, nor any other region inhabited by quite uncivilised man, has afforded us a single plant worth culture.
I don't say there is no standard, for that would destroy morality; only that there can be no standard until our impulses are classified and better understood.
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