sister

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blood sister

A girl or woman who has sworn loyalty to another despite not being biologically related. Sally and Rita are such good friends, you rarely see one without the other. They're blood sisters.
See also: blood, sister

older sister

A female who is older than one or more of her siblings. I'll ask my older sister to help us with the move. Connie's older sister will be there on Saturday, and I'd really like you to meet her. Our neighbor Jill was like an older sister to me when I was growing up.
See also: older, sister

(soul) sister

a black person's female, black friend. Many of the top singing groups of the '60s featured soul sisters.

weak sister

a timid person, usually a male. It looks like Dave is the weak sister on the team. We've got to pull together and stop playing like a bunch of weak sisters.
See also: sister, weak

sister

1. n. a (female) friend. (Originally underworld. Sometimes a term of address.) Come here, sister. I gotta have a word with you.
2. n. a fellow sorority member. One of my sisters let me borrow her car.
3. n. a fellow feminist. We can do this thing, sisters, we can do it!
4. Go to (soul) sister.

sob sister

n. a weak woman who is prone to crying. I had another sob sister in the office today. Went through half a box of tissues.
See also: sister, sob

(soul) sister

n. a black person’s female, black friend. (see also sister.) One of the soul sisters dropped by to talk.
See also: sister, soul

sister

verb

weak sister

n. a timid person, usually a male. Another weak sister and we’ll have to quit. We’ve got to pull together.
See also: sister, weak

sob sister

Someone devoted to charities, or (less charitably) a do-gooder. Originally a newspaper reporter or editor, invariably a woman, whose assignment was to produce sentimental stories and interviews that would appeal to female readers. By extension, the phrase came to mean any overly emotional person, whether male or female, especially one involved in charitable and public service efforts where sad tales of the recipients would tug on their heartstrings.
See also: sister, sob
References in classic literature ?
As she said the words, she abruptly stepped forward to pass her sister and return to the house.
I did something - bowed, I suppose - and was all attention, when the other sister struck in.
I would willingly do this, my sister, though I have never laboured in the fields, for wherever I have dwelt the men have kept me back from all work, save such as the weaving of flowers or the stringing of beads.
It shows an affection for her sister that is very pleasing," said Bingley.
I confess, my love," said Miss Emmerson, glancing her eye at Katherine, "that I had different views for ourselves next winter: has not Miss Miller a married sister living in town?
When the subject was brought forward again, her views were more fully explained; and, in reply to Lady Bertram's calm inquiry of "Where shall the child come to first, sister, to you or to us?
There was a strong assumption of superiority in this Puritanic toleration, hardly less trying to the blond flesh of an unenthusiastic sister than a Puritanic persecution.
It was a bright and sunny morning in the pleasant time of summer, when one of those black monks emerged from the abbey portal, and bent his steps towards the house of the fair sisters.
Fairlie had received his first intimation of his niece's death from his sister, Madame Fosco, this letter also not containing any exact reference to dates.
But when she came down she found the brother and all his sisters together by the ears; they were angry, even to passion, at his upbraiding them with their being homely, and having never had any sweethearts, never having been asked the question, and their being so forward as almost to ask first.
My sister, ma'am,' said Fanny, in whom there was a singular mixture of deference and hardihood, 'has been asking me to tell her, as between sisters, how I came to have the honour of knowing you.
Deane; and some persons were even of opinion that Miss Susan Dodson, who was once held to have made the worst match of all the Dodson sisters, might one day ride in a better carriage, and live in a better house, even than her sister Pullet.
Well, this was her sister, her little sister, much younger than Nell, whom she had not seen (so the story went afterwards) for five years, and to bring whom to that place on a short visit, she had been saving her poor means all that time.
My sister had a trenchant way of cutting our bread-and-butter for us, that never varied.
Dinarzade had no particular gifts to distinguish her from other girls, but her sister was clever and courageous in the highest degree.