Simon Legree


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Simon Legree

(ˈsɑɪmən ləˈgri)
n. a very hard taskmaster; a hard boss. (From the name of the slave driver in Uncle Tom’s Cabin.) Ask Simon Legree if I will be able to stop work and go home for breakfast now.
See also: Simon
References in periodicals archive ?
Simon Legree in Uncle Tom's Cabin epitomizes the consuming slaveholder who will settle for nothing less than the slave's total objectification and dissolution--a complete erasure of his subjectivity.
Although her presentation of the submissive Uncle Tom has devolved into a negative stereotype and a derogatory appellative, a careful examination of Uncle Tom's subjectivity in the last part of the narrative shows a balancing of his Christian submissiveness with a stubborn refusal to violate his principles, an assertion of his subjectivity, and a concerted, effective resistance to Simon Legree.
Simon Legree embraces slavery because he can make money from it and because it gives him even more absolute power over his workers than he could find in the North or in England.
Clare makes plans to manumit his slaves but is killed before he can do so, and the brutal Simon Legree, Tom's new owner, has Tom whipped to death after he refuses to divulge the whereabouts of certain runaway slaves.
The villainous vizier is a snake-eyed shape-shifter, the off-spring of a road company Simon Legree and the evil queen of Sleeping Beauty.
Stowe's mission is to show how motherly feeling and Christlike love can convert men and even overcome the ultimate model of marketplace manhood, Simon Legree.
Cruelly treated by a Yankee plantation owner, Simon Legree, Tom dies as the result of a beating.
Others may think of villains like Simon Legree or heroines like Girl in "The Girl of the Golden West.
Thomas Hammons doesn't get much to sing, but he offered effective comic relief as Henry Kissinger (a latter-day Simon Legree in Madame Mao's agitprop production of Act II), while Marc Heller did what he could with the oddly secondary character of Mao, who drifts between historical re-imaginings and psychosocial fantasy.
The second idea that students begin to call into question after reading the narratives is the image of the sadistic planter Simon Legree (the character in Harriet Beacher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin), who enjoys beating his slaves.
The Simon Legree of liberal capitalism, he is a man made monstrous by his own all-consuming greed.
His death not only leads to the eventual escape of Emmeline and Cassy, the two captives of the diabolical Simon Legree, but it leads to the freedom of all the slaves on the Shelby farm.
This transformation, according to Claybaugh, resulted in such characters and films (with their stereotypes) as Bill "Bojangles" Robinson playing Tom in The Littlest Rebel, Judy Garland playing Topsy in Everybody Sing, and Abbot and Costello playing Simon Legree and Eva in The Naughty Nineties.
A slave in 1859 living under the likes of Simon Legree could reasonably argue that a slave rebellion was both reasonable and proportionate to the wretchedness he was suffering, while innocent infants slain in a slave rebellion could reasonably argue the opposite.
They were flogged and abused by their own Simon Legrees.