shilling

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cut off with a shilling

To be intentionally disinherited from a will by being bequeathed a single shilling rather than left nothing at all. Primarily heard in UK. My father never liked that I gave up medicine to become a writer, so he cut me off with a shilling when he died.
See also: cut, off, shilling

cut off

1. verb Literally, to remove something from something else by cutting. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "cut" and "off." Your plant might bloom again if you cut off the dead flowers.
2. verb To aggressively pull or move in front of another driver. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "cut" and "off." Can you believe that jerk cut me off like that? I nearly hit him!
3. verb To interrupt one and stop them from talking. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "cut" and "off." After my mom had been droning on for nearly five minutes, I just had to cut her off. Hey, don't cut me off—I'm not done my story.
4. verb To stop something from working; to turn something off. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "cut" and "off." When the fuse blew, it cut off the power to the entire second floor. Look, if you don't pay your bill, the electric company will cut off your electricity.
5. verb To stop giving money to someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "cut" and "off." My parents have threatened to cut me off as soon as I turn 30, so I need to find a job. If the school board cuts off funding for the arts, then what will become of the theater program?
6. verb To change direction. Follow the river to where it cuts off to the left and then you'll see the picnic area.
7. verb To turn off a particular road. And then you cut off here and get on this dirt road. I swear we're almost there.
8. verb To prevent access to a particular area or thing. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "cut" and "off." I had to take a detour because the water department had blocked a bunch of streets, cutting me off from my house.
9. verb To isolate or sequester someone. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "cut" and "off." The investigators plan to cut the suspect off from his bosses, in the hope that he will confess.
10. verb To end unexpectedly or abruptly. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "cut" and "off." No one was disappointed when the principal's microphone came unplugged, cutting off his speech. Aw man, why did the music cut off?
11. verb To intercept something, as of an infielder in baseball. The shortstop cut off the throw from the outfield, but the runner had already scored.
12. verb To disinherit or disown someone. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "cut" and "off." If you continue to fight with your mother like this, she may just cut you off and leave you with nothing.
13. adjective Indicating an end point for something. In this usage, the phrase is usually written as one word. The cutoff date for the contest is tomorrow, so I hope you've finished your entry.
14. adjective Describing one who intercepts the throw in baseball. In this usage, the phrase is usually written as one word. The shortstop acted as the cutoff man and then threw the ball to the catcher.
15. adjective Too intoxicated to keep being served alcohol. When I nearly fell off my stool for the third time, the bartender told me that I was cut off.
16. noun The act of ending or stopping something. When used as an noun, the phrase is usually written as one word. If there is a cutoff of funding, then what will become of the theater program?
17. noun Pants that have been cut into shorts, typically with a ragged hem. In this usage, the phrase is usually written as one word and pluralized ("cutoffs"). I had only brought jeans with me on the trip, and it was so hot that I had to turn them into cutoffs.
See also: cut, off

cut off

 
1. to stop by itself or oneself. The machine got hot and cut off. Bob cut off in midsentence.
2. to turn off a road, path, highway, etc. This is the place where you are supposed to cut off. When you come to a cutoff on the left, continue on for about mile.
See also: cut, off

cut someone or something off (from something)

to block or isolate someone or something from some place or something. They cut the cattle off from the wheat field. The enemy tanks cut off the troops from their camp.
See also: cut, off

cut someone or something off (short)

Fig. to interrupt someone or something; to prevent someone from continuing to speak. (See also chop someone off.) In the middle of her sentence, the teacher cut her off short. Bob cut off Mary when she was trying to explain.
See also: cut, off

cut something off

 
1. to shorten something. Cut this board off a bit, would you? Cut off this board a little, please.
2. to turn something off, such as power, electricity, water, the engine, etc. Would you please cut that engine off? Cut off the engine, Chuck.
See also: cut, off

cut off

1. Separate from others, isolate, as in The construction debris cut off the workers from the canteen, or The new sect was cut off from the church. [Late 1500s]
2. Stop suddenly, discontinue, as in He quickly cut off the engine, or The drama was cut off by a news flash about tornado warnings. [Late 1500s]
3. Shut off, bar, Their phone was cut off when they didn't pay the bill, or Tom's father threatened to cut off his allowance. [c. 1600]
4. Interrupt the course or passage of, intercept, as in The operator cut us off, or The shortstop cut off the throw to the plate. [Late 1500s]
5. Also, cut off with a shilling or cent . Disinherit, as in Grandfather cut him off with a shilling. This usage dates from the early 1700s; the purpose of bequeathing one shilling (a small sum) was to indicate that the heir had not been overlooked but was intentionally being disinherited. In America cent was substituted from about 1800 on.
See also: cut, off

not the full shilling

BRITISH, INFORMAL
If you say that someone is not the full shilling, you mean that they are stupid or crazy. We all thought he wasn't quite the full shilling because he was slow — slow at sums and slow at writing.
See also: full, not, shilling

no more than ninepence in the shilling

of low intelligence. dated
Since the decimalization of the British coinage, this phrase has gradually fallen out of use, but there are numerous other humorous variations on the theme of someone not possessing their proper share of brains or intelligence, for example a sandwich short of a picnic (see sandwich).
See also: more, ninepence, shilling

not the full shilling

not mentally alert or quick-thinking.
See also: full, not, shilling

take the King's (or Queen's) shilling

enlist as a soldier. British
It was once the practice to pay a shilling to a man who enlisted as a soldier.
See also: shilling, take

cut off

v.
1. To remove something by cutting: I cut off the tree branch. He cut his beard off.
2. To interrupt someone who is speaking: Don't cut me off like that. The speaker was cut off by the crowd. The principal cut off the discussion when the assembly started.
3. To separate someone from others; isolate someone: I don't want to cut my brother off from his friends. She was cut off from her family while she was gone. All contact was cut off.
4. To stop something from functioning by disconnecting it from its source of power: Cut the power off. The landlord cut off the heat. The lights got cut off.
5. To interrupt the course or passage of something: The infielder cut off the throw to the plate. The police cut all the routes of escape off.
6. To interrupt or break the line of communication of someone: The telephone operator cut us off. The storm cut off the phone lines.
7. To stop or come to an end suddenly: The music suddenly cut off.
8. To change from one direction to another: The road goes straight over the hill and then cuts off to the right around the pond.
9. To disinherit someone: They cut their heirs off without a cent. My parents changed their will and cut me off after I left home.
10. To discontinue the funding for something, such as a government program: School breakfasts were cut off after the funding cuts. The mayor cut off free school lunches from the budget.
11. To drive into the space in front of a moving car, often suddenly and recklessly: That taxi cut me off on the highway. The truck cut off the small car abruptly.
See also: cut, off
References in classic literature ?
If you keep payin' at this rate, there'll be a rush of laborers to the college, and competition'll soon bring you down from a shilling to sixpence, let alone ninepence.
On the wedding day, we may suppose that honest John Hull dressed himself in a plum-colored coat, all the buttons of which were made of pine-tree shillings.
Whenever the steward transferred from ship to ship of the Burns Philp fleet, he always stipulated that Kwaque should accompany him and be duly rated at ten shillings.
That is as much as to say that you had rather not accept the place, and that you consider fifteen shillings a week too little,' said Mr Gregsbury, ringing.
Here Jones interrupted him, saying, "I will be so far from making any words with you, that I will give you a shilling more than your demand.
I'll give you five shillings for him," begins the boy who had opened the ticket.
This was perhaps a rich man for Mull; he would have scarce been thought so in the south; for it took all he had -- the whole house was turned upside down, and a neighbour brought under contribution, before he could scrape together twenty shillings in silver.
he said, as comment, with a furtive glance towards Miss Twinkleton, and lining out pounds, shillings, and pence: 'I spoke of having got among the angels
In the seven minutes he had been waiting two frightful fiends closed in on Lord Dawlish, requesting loans of five shillings till Wednesday week and Saturday week respectively, and he had parted with the money without a murmur.
That,' rejoined the secretary, doing as he was told, 'is all-- except Mrs Varden's box (fourteenth time of opening), seven shillings and sixpence in silver and copper, and half-a-guinea in gold; and Miggs (being the saving of a quarter's wages), one-and- threepence.
That from the father mentioned that most unexpectedly finding himself in the novel position of having been disappointed of a remittance from the City on which he had confidently counted, he took up his pen, being restrained by the unhappy circumstance of his incarceration during three-and-twenty years (doubly underlined), from coming himself, as he would otherwise certainly have done--took up his pen to entreat Mr Clennam to advance him the sum of Three Pounds Ten Shillings upon his I.
Fifty-seven churches to be erected with half-crowns, forty-two parsonage houses to be repaired with shillings, seven-and-twenty organs to be built with halfpence, twelve hundred children to be brought up on postage stamps.
I gave the last farthing, all to that shilling, to the French trader, this very morning, as I came through the town, for powder; so, as you have nothing, we can have but one shot for it.
The only thing to be careful about is that you do not pay more than a shilling for the shilling you earn.
Half of the money went to the French Revolution, half to purchase Lord Gaunt's Marquisate and Garter--and the remainder--" but it forms no part of our scheme to tell what became of the remainder, for every shilling of which, and a great deal more, little Tom Eaves, who knows everybody's affairs, is ready to account.