Nice play, Shakespeare!

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Nice play, Shakespeare!

A sarcastic observation on someone's dumb behavior. Similarly, “Smooth move, ExLax!”
See also: nice
References in classic literature ?
When my friend left us for want of work in the office, or from the vagarious impulse which is so strong in our craft, I took my Shakespeare no longer to the woods and fields, but pored upon him mostly by night, in the narrow little space which I had for my study, under the stairs at home.
For instance, I have never surpassed Shakespeare as a poet, though I once firmly meant to do so; but then, it is to be remembered that very few other people have surpassed him, and that it would not have been easy.
Some people like to think that Shakespeare was a schoolmaster for a time, others that he was a clerk in a lawyer's office.
The lady whom Shakespeare married was named Anne Hathaway.
A little while after their marriage a daughter was born to Anne and William Shakespeare.
In spite of the fact that Shakespeare had now a wife and children to look after, he had not settled down.
Nearly 7,000 primary schools across the UK will be introduced to the works of William Shakespeare this week as part of Shakespeare Week, an annual celebration organised by the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust in Stratford-upon-Avon, which is designed to bring Shakespeare's works and creative legacy to life for everyone's enjoyment and creative learning.
That value accrues from a process of reciprocal legitimation, whereby Shakespeare's association with a mass-cultural product, medium, or genre lends that item a moiety of highbrow depth, "universality," authority, continuity with established tradition, or seriousness of purpose, while at the same time the association with mass culture lends Shakespeare street credibility, broad intelligibility, and celebrity.
Children as young as five will be given lessons in Shakespeare to increase study of the Bard.
Written by professional Shakespearean play editor David Bevington (professor emeritus, University of Chicago), How To Read A Shakespeare Play is a guide to experiencing Shakespeare's classic works with an open, inquisitive, and receptive mind.
A rogue can indeed -- to borrow from another Shakespeare play -- smile, and smile, and be a villain.
The word's been out for generations: American high schoolers will have to study Shakespeare.
Usborne Stories From Shakespeare pre-sents classic stories from Shakespeare's famous plays retold by Anna Claybourne in straightforward prose for young adult readers, illustrated by Elena Temporin with simple and charming color artwork.
Ben Jonson famously said that Shakespeare was not for an age, but for the ages, an elegant way of saying that the wisdom of Shakespeare is timeless.
Andrew Gurr's study does more than offer a detailed portrait of Shakespeare's theatrical company: It offers a new and somewhat controversial vision of what kind of artist Shakespeare was.