scene

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create a scene

To create a loud, typically angry disturbance or display in public, such that it draws attention to those involved. Robert created a scene in the store when they refused to refund him for the broken television. My parents always create a scene with their fighting wherever we go.
See also: create, scene

arrive (up)on the scene

1. To reach a destination, usually as something is happening there. When did the police arrive on the scene? By the time I arrived upon the scene, Kate and Jen were already arguing.
2. slang To come into existence or to be born. Funk music arrived on the scene in the 1960s. We are overjoyed to announced that our baby daughter arrived on the scene at 11:37 last night.
See also: arrive, scene

arrive (up)on the scene (of something)

 and arrive at the scene (of something)
to reach the location of an event in progress. (Upon is formal and less commonly used than on and at.) The police arrived on the scene of the crime. They arrived upon the scene of a frightening accident. What did they do when they arrived at the scene?
See also: arrive, on, scene

behind the scenes

without receiving credit or fame; out of public view. (Referring originally to those who worked on a theatrical piece but do not appear on the stage.) The people who worked behind the scenes are the real heroes of this project. I worked behind the scenes in the play. We should thank the people who are behind the scenes of our success.
See also: behind, scene

burst onto the scene

Fig. to appear suddenly in a location. When Charles burst onto the scene, no one was prepared for the news he brought. The police suddenly burst onto the scene and arrested everyone in the room.
See also: burst, scene

burst (up)on the scene

to appear suddenly somewhere; to enter or arrive suddenly some place. (Upon is formal and less commonly used than on.) The police suddenly burst upon the scene. They burst on the scene and took control.
See also: burst, on, scene

come on the scene

 and arrive on the scene 
1. Lit. to arrive at a place. When we came on the scene, the ambulances were already there. The police arrived on the scene and began directing traffic.
2. Fig. to become part of a situation. She thought she was in love with Harry until Bob came on the scene.
See also: come, on, scene

make a scene

 and create a scene
Fig. to make a public display or disturbance. When John found a fly in his drink, he started to create a scene. Oh, John, please don't make a scene. Just forget about it.
See also: make, scene

make the scene

 
1. S/. to attend an event. We plan to make the scene, but we may be a bit late. I hope everybody can make the scene.
2. Sl. to understand a situation; to appreciate the situation. I can't quite make the scene, but it looks like Willie punched the guy over here. Then he moved to the window over here, and that's when the woman across the street saw him. I can make the scene. It's just like you said, except Willie came in and found the guy laid out on the floor.
See also: make, scene

on the scene

Fig. available or present where something is happening or where something has happened. The ambulance was on the scene almost immediately. I wasn't on the scene when it happened.
See also: on, scene

burst onto the scene

to suddenly become famous Marsalis burst onto the scene in the early 1980s and proved that jazz could have its own superstars.
See also: burst, scene

make a scene

to be loud and rude with other people or in public My father made a scene, then raced upstairs, slamming the door so hard that the window broke.
See also: make, scene

make the scene

to be active in a social activity She hopes to be behind the wheel, making the scene with her friends, after she gets her driver's license.
See also: make, scene

on the scene

in a place where something is happening Reporters arrived on the scene within minutes of the explosion. The US commander on the scene has requested 2,000 more troops.
See also: on, scene

set the scene (for something)

1. to make something possible or likely to happen The recent resignation of two cabinet members has set the scene for a pre-election crisis.
2. to describe a situation so that people can understand what is happening Let me just set the scene briefly and my colleague will add some details later.
See also: scene, set

behind the scenes

quietly, in a way that does not attract attention Diplomats have been working hard behind the scenes in preparation for the talks.
See also: behind, scene

behind the scenes

if something happens behind the scenes, it happens secretly, especially when something else is happening publicly Diplomats have been working hard behind the scenes in preparation for the peace talks.
See also: behind, scene

set the scene

to describe a situation where something is going to happen soon First, let's set the scene - it was a cold dark night with a strong wind blowing...
See also: scene, set

set the scene for something

if you set the scene for something, you make it possible or likely to happen The recent resignation of two government ministers has set the scene for a pre-election crisis.
See also: scene, set

behind the scenes

In secret or private, away from public view, as in His struggle for the top position took place strictly behind the scenes. This term alludes to the various activities that go on behind the curtain in theaters, out of the audience's view. [Late 1700s] Also see behind closed doors.
See also: behind, scene

make a scene

Also, create a scene; make an uproar. Make a public disturbance or excited emotional display. For example, Joan made a scene when the restaurant lost her dinner reservation, or Ted made an uproar over losing his luggage. Make a scene was first recorded in 1831; the variant employs uproar in the sense of "a noisy commotion," a usage first recorded in 1548.
See also: make, scene

make the scene

Put in an appearance, take part in an event, as in I'll miss most of the party, but I hope to make the scene before midnight. This expression employs scene in the sense of "a place where an action occurs." [Slang; mid-1900s]
See also: make, scene

on the scene, be

Also, arrive or come on the scene . Be or arrive where an action or event occurs, as in They won't have a wild party because their parents will be on the scene, or Once Bob arrives on the scene, you can expect fireworks. Alluding to the theatrical scene, where a drama is being played, this phrase has been used more loosely since the early 1700s.
See also: on

set the scene for

Also, set the stage for. Provide the underlying basis or background for, make likely or inevitable, as in Their fights about money set the scene for a divorce, or The comptroller's assessment of the firm's finances set the stage for a successful bond issue . These expressions allude to arranging a play's actors and properties on a theatrical stage. The first term dates from the late 1700s, the variant from the late 1800s.
See also: scene, set

heavy scene

n. a serious state of affairs; an emotionally charged situation. Man, that meeting was really a heavy scene.
See also: heavy, scene

make the scene

1. tv. to attend an event. (see also scene.) I hope everybody can make the scene.
2. tv. to understand a situation; to appreciate the situation. (see also make.) I can’t quite make the scene, but it looks like Sam punched the guy over here. Then he moved to the window over here, and that’s when the old dame across the street saw him.
See also: make, scene

scene

(sin)
1. n. a place; a setting. (see also make the scene.) I need a different scene. Life is too hectic here.
2. n. the drug-use environment; the drug scene. The longer you spend in a scene like this, the harder it is to sober up and go straight.
3. n. one’s preference. (see also bag.) This nine-to-five stuff just isn’t my scene. I quit.

make the scene

Slang
1. To put in an appearance: made the scene at the party.
2. To participate in a specified activity: made the drug scene.
See also: make, scene

behind the scenes

1. Backstage.
2. Out of public view; in secret.
See also: behind, scene

set the scene

/stage for
To provide the underlying basis for: saber rattling that set the stage for war.
See also: scene, set
References in classic literature ?
But now the scene is changed: Peace crowns the sylvan shade.
Even yet, though my thoughts were ultimately much absorbed in the task, it wears, to my eye, a stern and sombre aspect: too much ungladdened by genial sunshine; too little relieved by the tender and familiar influences which soften almost every scene of nature and real life, and undoubtedly should soften every picture of them.
He could not help, too, rolling his large eyes round him as he ate, and chuckling with the possibility that he might one day be lord of all this scene of almost unimaginable luxury and splendor.
The stout lady with the wig (and the excellent heart) personated the sentimental Julia from an inveterately tragic point of view, and used her handkerchief distractedly in the first scene.
According to the proclivities of each reasoner, play, love, ambition, hidden disorders, and vices, explained the catastrophe, the last scene of a drama begun in 1812.
The side of the quadrangle, in which she supposed the guilty scene to be acting, being, according to her belief, just opposite her own, it struck her that, if judiciously watched, some rays of light from the general's lamp might glimmer through the lower windows, as he passed to the prison of his wife; and, twice before she stepped into bed, she stole gently from her room to the corresponding window in the gallery, to see if it appeared; but all abroad was dark, and it must yet be too early.
One says, "Of the beauty of the scene I can not say enough," and then proceeds to cover up with a woof of glittering sentences a thing which, when stripped for inspection, proves to be only an unobtrusive basin of water, some mountainous desolation, and one tree.
Here is a scene in the vaults of the palace,' he began.
My lodgings were situated at a height of about 2000 feet; here the weather was cold and boisterous, with constant showers of rain; and every now and then the whole scene was veiled in thick clouds.
Among these traditions were the disregard for unity, partly of action, but especially of time and place; the mingling of comedy with even the intensest scenes of tragedy; the nearly complete lack of stage scenery, with a resultant willingness in the audience to make the largest possible imaginative assumptions; the presence of certain stock figures, such as the clown; and the presentation of women's parts by men and boys.
The scene thus framed was so coloured and quaint, like a back scene in a play, that they forgot a moment the insignificant figure standing in the door.
When any extraordinary scene presents itself (as we trust will often be the case), we shall spare no pains nor paper to open it at large to our reader; but if whole years should pass without producing anything worthy his notice, we shall not be afraid of a chasm in our history; but shall hasten on to matters of consequence, and leave such periods of time totally unobserved.
There are scenes of all sorts; some dreadful combats, some grand and lofty horse-riding, some scenes of high life, and some of very middling indeed; some love-making for the sentimental, and some light comic business; the whole accompanied by appropriate scenery and brilliantly illuminated with the Author's own candles.
Six years had passed since then: I was a wreck, but nought had changed in those savage and enduring scenes.
It is believed that the scene of this tale, and most of the information necessary to understand its allusions, are rendered sufficiently obvious to the reader in the text itself, or in the accompanying notes.