Scales


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turn the scale(s)

To change the balance of a situation, such that one side or element is favored or gains advantage. The two candidates are so close in the polls that both are vying for something that will turn the scale in their favor. The immense interconnectivity of social media has turned the scales of power somewhat back into the hands of the ordinary population.
See also: turn

tilt the scale(s)

To change the balance of a situation, such that one side or element is favored or gains advantage. The two candidates are so close in the polls that both are vying for something that will tilt the scale in their favor. The immense interconnectivity of social media has tilted the scales of power somewhat back into the hands of the ordinary population.
See also: tilt

have scales fall from (one's) eyes

To suddenly be able to see a situation clearly and accurately. I used to be so in love with Andrew, but now that we've broken up, I've had scales fall from my eyes, and I can see how oafish he truly is! Once you start working somewhere new, it doesn't take long until you have the scales fall from your eyes, and you can see all of the problems of your "perfect" new job.
See also: eye, fall, have, Scales

thumb on the scale

A method of deception or manipulation that creates an unfair advantage for the swindler, likened to a merchant holding a thumb on the scale when weighing goods for sale, therefore increasing the weight and price. You have to suspect that the casinos have their thumb on the scale when it comes to the slot machines. There's no way you're getting fair odds.
See also: on, scale, thumb

bud scale

The hard, protective layer surrounding the buds of some plants. Oh, that's just a bud scale—your plant is fine.
See also: bud, scale

tip the balance

To upset the balance of a situation, such that one side or element is favored or gains advantage. The two candidates are so close in the polls that both are vying for something that will tip the balance in their favor. The immense interconnectivity of social media has tipped the balance of power somewhat back into the hands of the ordinary population.
See also: balance, tip

tip the scale(s)

To upset the balance of a situation, such that one side or element is favored or gains advantage. The two candidates are so close in the polls that both are vying for something that will tip the scale in their favor. The immense interconnectivity of social media has tipped the scales of power somewhat back into the hands of the ordinary population.
See also: tip

scale back

To minimize or reduce something in size or scope. A noun or pronoun can be used between "scale" and "back." With such a dramatic decrease in funding, we're going to have to scale back on our project now.
See also: back, scale

scale up

1. To climb up something. How long do you think it will take us to scale up the mountain?
2. To increase something in size or scope. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "scale" and "up." With this sudden increase in funding, we can finally scale up our research project! Can you scale this drawing up? I'd love to have a model to present to the board.
See also: scale, up

tip the scales at (something)

To weigh a certain amount. That fish you caught today tipped the scales at 21 pounds! I knew I needed to lose weight once I tipped the scales at 200 pounds.
See also: Scales, tip

the scales fall from somebody's eyes

To suddenly be able to see a situation clearly and accurately. I used to be so in love with Andrew, but now that we've broken up, the scales have fallen from my eyes, and I can see how selfish he truly is! Once you start working somewhere new, it doesn't take long until the scales fall from your eyes, and you can see all of the problems of your "perfect" new job.
See also: eye, fall, Scales

scale down

1. To climb down something. How long do you think it will take us to scale down the mountain?
2. To reduce or decrease something in size or scope. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "scale" and "down." With this sudden decrease in funding, we will have to scale down the project to just five staff members! Can you scale this model down so that it will fit on the boardroom table?
See also: down, scale

scale something down

to reduce the size or cost of something. The bad economy forced us to scale the project down. Liz scaled down the project.
See also: down, scale

tip the scales at something

to weigh a particular weight. Albert tips the scales at nearly 200 pounds. The champ weighed in and tipped the scales at 180.
See also: Scales, tip

scale down

Reduce the size or cost of, as in The owners decided to scale down wages. This expression, along with the related scale up, which refers to an increase, alludes to scale in the sense of "a fixed standard." [Late 1800s]
See also: down, scale

tip the balance

Also, tip the scales; turn the scale. Offset the balance and thereby favor one side or precipitate an action. For example, He felt that affirmative action had tipped the balance slightly in favor of minority groups , or New high-tech weapons definitely tipped the scales in the Gulf War, or Just one more mistake will turn the scale against them. Shakespeare used turn the scale literally in Measure for Measure (4:2): "You weigh equally; a feather will turn the scale." The idioms with tip are much younger, dating from the first half of the 1900s.
See also: balance, tip

the scales fall from your eyes

LITERARY
If the scales fall from your eyes, you suddenly realise the truth about something after a long period of not understanding it or of being deceived about it. It was at that point that the scales finally fell from his eyes and he realised he had made a dreadful mistake. Note: This is a reference to the Bible story of Saul, who became blind after he had a vision of God on the road to Damascus. Saul became a Christian after Ananias, a follower of Jesus, restored his sight. The Bible says: `And immediately there fell from his eyes as it had been scales: and he received sight forthwith, and arose, and was baptized.' (Acts 9:18)
See also: eye, fall, Scales

tip the balance

or

tip the scales

COMMON If something tips the balance or tips the scales in a situation where two results seem equally likely, it makes one result happen or become much more likely. As the election approaches, the two main parties appear so evenly matched that just one issue could tip the balance. Years later, she still believed it had been Howe's warnings, not any love for her, that had finally tipped the scales against his leaving her for Lucy.
See also: balance, tip

the scales fall from someone's eyes

someone is no longer deceived.
In the Bible, this expression described how St Paul, blinded by his vision on the road to Damascus, received his sight back at the hand of God (Acts 9:18).
See also: eye, fall, Scales

tip (or turn) the scales at

have a weight of a specified amount.
See also: Scales, tip

tip (or turn) the scales (or balance)

(of a circumstance or event) be the deciding factor; make the critical difference.
See also: Scales, tip

the ˌscales fall from somebody’s ˈeyes

(literary) somebody finally understands the truth about something: It wasn’t until much later that the scales fell from his eyes and he realized that she’d been lying to him.In the Bible, this expression describes the moment when St Paul suddenly began to believe in Jesus and was able to see again.
See also: eye, fall, Scales

tip the ˈbalance/ˈscales

(also swing the ˈbalance) be the reason that finally causes somebody to do something or something to happen in one way rather than another: They were both very good candidates for the job but she had more experience and that tipped the balance.
See also: balance, Scales, tip

tip the scales at something

weigh a particular amount: He tipped the scales at just over 80 kilos.
See also: Scales, something, tip

scale back

v.
To reduce the scope or extent of something according to a standard or by degrees; reduce something in calculated amounts: The company scaled back the scheduled pay increase. After reviewing its budget, the school scaled its sports activities back.
See also: back, scale

scale down

v.
1. To climb down something; descend something: The climber carefully scaled down the cliff.
2. To reduce the scope or extent of something according to a standard or by degrees; reduce something in calculated amounts: The lawyer advised them to scale down their demands. We decided our travel plans were unrealistic, so we scaled them down.
See also: down, scale

scale up

v.
1. To climb up something; ascend something: The hikers scaled up the side of the mountain.
2. To increase the scope or extent of something according to a standard or by degrees; increase something in calculated amounts: The company scaled up its operations to meet the growing demand. The city scaled its efforts up to reduce crime.
See also: scale, up

tip the scales

1. To register weight (at a certain amount).
2. To offset the balance of a situation.
See also: Scales, tip
References in periodicals archive ?
Founded in 1979, System Scale has positioned itself in the weights and measures industry as a leader in building trust, developing relationships, and providing advice to its customers.
I do sell quite a lot of scales in a year's time, approximately $60,000," Samsa continued.
Student perceptions of the learning environment were similar for all three classes; however, on two scales of the DELES, Actual Instructor Support and Actual Student Interaction and Collaboration, the online course was rated lower.
The pianist progresses through triad and inversion exercises built on diatonic triads in each key, learning about triad construction from the major scale.
This approach has several advantages: 1) it models the actual aquatic environment used by the mosquitoes, not a filtered proxy; 2) it offers continuous real-time prediction of hydrologic conditions, that is unconstrained by orbital patterns, cloud cover, or vegetation; 3) it resolves the whereabouts of the potential breeding habitats at a very fine scale (areas as small as 10-m cells); and 4) hydrologic models are readily coupled to global climate models, allowing additional medium- and long-range forecast of hydrologic conditions.
For those who have the need, understand the pros and cons of the various architectural approaches and carefully choose the right solution through consideration of scale, functionality, manageability and support, they will experience a transformation of their storage infrastructure, one that makes their environment more dynamic, continuously available and ultimately, better able to deliver on the needs of the business.
Unfortunately, few have determined whether patterns are consistent across scales or whether related phenomena cross scales (Caldow and Racey 2000).
Observation on the differences between pre- and post evaluation mean scores for the Piers-Harris Children's Self Concept Scale revealed gains in three of the experimental classes concerning students' self ratings of self concept.
There are limitations to pneumatically charged scales, some of which are common to the conventional vertical systems, and must be considered in any application.
Sightlines across cranked walkways are at the scale of the site; sightlines between kitchen and play-deck are at a domestic scale.
As a result, scale indeterminacy poses a serious problem for value-added assessment, The burden of proof is on its practitioners to show that ratings assigned to educators do not vary when alternative (but in all essential respects, equivalent) scales are used, That burden of proof has not been met.
Given the basic material involved at the primary level and the intent of building a sound foundation for later academic development, a ``90-80-70'' scale is justified.
A set of measurement scales is ipsative when the sum (or mean) of the scores obtained across the scales for each person is a constant.
Items are rated on four point Likert-type scales that do not allow for neutral responses, with total scores computed by summing across items and higher scores reflecting greater satisfaction.
A systematical analysis of animal and poultry production costs and benefits on different scales and in different regions of China will help provide insight on the following issues: