sat

(redirected from Sats)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

sit like piffy on a rock cake

To be conspicuous but ignored or left out, especially from a group or activity. (A "rock bun" or "rock cake" is a type of hard cake with currants; what "piffy" refers to is unknown.) Primarily heard in UK. I was excited to go with my wife to her awards ceremony, but I didn't know anyone there and ended up sitting like piffy on a rock cake. After Tommy hit one of the other boys in his class, he was left sitting like piffy on a rock cake during playtime.
See also: cake, like, on, piffy, rock, sit

sit like piffy on a rock bun

To be conspicuous but ignored or left out, especially from a group or activity. (A "rock bun" or "rock cake" is a type of hard cake with currants; what "piffy" refers to is unknown.) Primarily heard in UK. I was excited to go with my wife to her awards ceremony, but I didn't know anyone there and ended up sitting like piffy on a rock bun. After Tommy hit one of the other boys in his class, he was left sitting like piffy on a rock bun during playtime.
See also: bun, like, on, piffy, rock, sit

sit tall in the/(one's) saddle

To be or remain proud, stoical, or august in one's manner or composure. Even after two years of a losing war, the general still sat tall in his saddle before his troops. I'll have nothing to do with your schemes or plot. One day, you're going to be locked up and lose everything, and I'll be sitting tall in the saddle when you do.
See also: saddle, sit, tall

sit at (someone's) feet

To be in a position of devotion or worship to someone; to pay homage or reverential attention to someone. I've been sitting at the professor's feet ever since I heard his astounding lecture on quantum mechanics. My brother chose to sit at the saints' feet for the rest of his life, but I do not intend to pursue such a life of the cloth.
See also: feet, sit

sit (up)on hot cockles

To be impatient. Quit sitting on hot cockles—you'll get your birthday present soon enough.
See also: cockle, hot, sit

sit at the feet of (someone)

To be in a position of devotion or worship to someone; to pay homage to or be reverential to someone. I've been sitting at the feet of my renowned professor ever since I heard his astounding lecture on quantum mechanics. My brother chose to sit at the feet of the saints for the rest of his life, but I do not intend to pursue such a life of the cloth.
See also: feet, of, sit

sit up and take notice

To become alert and give one's complete attention to someone or something. Although he's been making music for years, it was his smash hit song last April that caused people to sit up and take notice. The president's proposed legislation has made many global leaders sit up and take notice.
See also: and, notice, sit, take, up

sit on the fence

To not make a decision or take a side when presented with two or more options or possibilities. You can't sit on the fence any longer—you need to choose who of these two we need to fire. The government has been sitting on the fence about legalizing marijuana for the past several years.
See also: fence, on, sit

sit up

1. To rise up to a sitting position after lying down. I woke up very thirsty, so I sat up to take a drink of water.
2. To raise someone up into a sitting position after they have been lying down. (A pronoun is used after "sit" in this usage.) They sat the patient up so she could see her visitors.
3. To sit in one's seat with a fixed, upright posture. Please sit up during class—it annoys me to see you slouching at your desk like that!
4. To suddenly take notice of something or become very alert. Our son sat up the moment we mentioned the possibility of going to Disneyland.
See also: sit, up

sit up with (one)

To stay awake past one's normal bedtime in order to care for someone. My daughter kept vomiting, so I had to sit up her through the night.
See also: sit, up

sit bodkin

obsolete To be squeezed tightly between two people while traveling, especially in a carriage. Pressed for time ahead of his appointment, the Duke was rather unceremoniously obliged to sit bodkin between the two daughters of his host.
See also: bodkin, sit

sit below the salt

old-fashioned To be in or at a position of low or common standing, rank, regard, or repute. The term is derived from the social hierarchy of nobility in medieval times, in which salt, a precious commodity then, was set in the middle of the dining table. Those of high noble rank were seated "above the salt," that is, closer to the lord and lady of the house, while those in lower social standing were seated "below" or "beneath" it. Robert's tech firm bankrupted last month, so I guess he's back to sitting below the salt with us again. I know it makes me a snob, but I just consider these big summer blockbusters to sit rather below the salt.
See also: below, salt, sit

sit beneath the salt

To be in or at a position of low or common standing, rank, regard, or repute. The term is derived from the social hierarchy of nobility in medieval times, in which salt, a precious commodity then, was set in the middle of the dining table. Those of high noble rank were seated "above the salt," that is, closer to the lord and lady of the house, while those in lower social standing were seated "below" or "beneath" it. Robert's tech firm bankrupted last month, so I guess he's back to sitting beneath the salt with us again. I know it makes me a snob, but I just consider these big summer blockbusters to sit rather beneath the salt.
See also: beneath, salt, sit

sit next to Nellie

old-fashioned To work alongside a person with a lot of experience so as to learn how best to do a job by watching them work. It used to be the case that new recruits would just sit next to "Nellie" when they joined the team; now, with how quickly technology is advancing, it's often the new recruits who have to explain how things work to the older members of staff.
See also: Nellie, next, sit

sit on (one's) tail

To follow close behind someone or something, especially in a car. Why is this guy sitting on my tail when I'm already going over the speed limit? I sat on his tail for nearly 30 minutes before I finally had a chance to pass him.
See also: on, sit, tail

sit on the fence

Fig. not to take sides in a dispute; not to make a clear choice between two possibilities. (Fig. on the image of someone straddling a fence, representing indecision.) When Jane and Tom argue, it is best to sit on the fence and not make either of them angry. No one knows which of the candidates Joan will vote for. She's sitting on the fence.
See also: fence, on, sit

sit on the fence

(about something) Go to on the fence (about something).
See also: fence, on, sit

sit up

 
1. to rise from a lying to a sitting position. When the alarm went off, he sat up and put his feet on the floor. She couldn't sleep, so she sat up and read a book.
2. to sit more straight in one's seat; to hold one's posture more upright while seated. Please sit up. Don't slouch! You wouldn't get backaches if you would sit up.
See also: sit, up

sit up and take notice

to become alert and pay attention. A loud noise from the front of the room caused everyone to sit up and take notice. The company wouldn't pay any attention to my complaints. When I had my lawyer write them a letter, they sat up and took notice.
See also: and, notice, sit, take, up

sit up

1. Rise to a sitting position from lying down, as in The sick child sat up and asked for a drink of water. [Early 1200s]
2. Stay up later than usual, as in The nurse sat up with her all night long. [Mid-1500s]
3. Sit with the spine erect, as in She was always telling the students to sit up. [Early 1700s]
4. Become suddenly alert, as in The students sat up when he brought up the test. The same sense appears in the related sit up and take notice, as in When he mentioned the arrival of a movie star, they all sat up and took notice. [Late 1800s]
See also: sit, up

sit on the fence

COMMON If you sit on the fence, you refuse to give a definite opinion about something or to say who you support in an argument. Who was cooler, Starsky or Hutch? You couldn't sit on the fence and say you liked both of them equally. Note: Verbs such as stay and be can be used instead of sit. Democrats who'd been on the fence about the nomination, in the end all voted for him. Note: You can call this kind of behaviour fence-sitting, and someone who behaves like this a fence-sitter. At his first press conference there was much fence-sitting. I sense that there are a lot of fence-sitters out there on this issue. Note: These expressions are usually used to show that you disapprove of the fact that someone is not making a decision. Note: The fence referred to is one that separates two properties or territories and someone sitting on it is unable or unwilling to make a decision about which side to stand on.
See also: fence, on, sit

sit up and take notice

If someone sits up and takes notice, they start paying attention to something because they realize it is important or worth noticing. In the last few years the medical world has begun to sit up and take notice of the role diet has to play in health. Pressure groups will need to campaign hard before anyone in power is forced to sit up and take notice.
See also: and, notice, sit, take, up

sit on the fence

avoid making a decision or choice.
The two sides of a fence are seen here as representing the two opposing or conflicting positions or interests involved in a particular debate or situation.
1995 Duncan McLean Bunker Man Let's have a proper decision—goal or no goal—none of this sitting on the fence.
See also: fence, on, sit

sit below the salt

be of lower social standing or worth.
This expression derives from the former custom of placing a large salt cellar midway down a long dining table at which people were seated in order of rank.
See also: below, salt, sit

sit next to Nellie

learn how to do a job or task by watching and copying someone experienced in it. informal
See also: Nellie, next, sit

sit up (and take notice)

suddenly start paying attention or have your interest aroused. informal
See also: sit, up

sit on the ˈfence

avoid deciding between two sides of an argument, discussion, quarrel, etc: Either you support me or you don’t. You can’t sit on the fence all your life.Politicians cannot sit on the fence. People expect them to have clear views. OPPOSITE: take sides ▶ ˈfence-sitter noun a person who cannot or does not want to decide which side of an argument, etc. to support
See also: fence, on, sit

sit up

v.
1. To rise from lying down to a sitting position: The patient sat up for her meal.
2. To sit with the spine erect: The nanny told the children to sit up.
3. To stay up later than the customary bedtime: My parents sat up waiting for me to come home.
4. To become suddenly alert: The students sat up when the teacher mentioned the test.
See also: sit, up
References in classic literature ?
And if I dared not go alone, how much less should I dare to go bearing with me him who sat in the cleft of the rock
For an hour or more I skinned, singing to myself as I worked, and striving to forget him who sat in the cleft above and the howlings which ran about the mountains.
I saw a light--perchance, Umslopogaas, it was the light of the moon, shining upon him that sat aloft at the end of the cave.
Many and many a year have I sat aloft, Galazi,' answered the voice,
At length, one day, as she sat singing in the sunny nook where all her fairest flowers bloomed, weary with gazing at the far-off sky for the little form she hoped would come, she bent to look with joyful love upon her bosom flower; and as she looked, its folded leaves spread wide apart, and, rising slowly from the deep white cup, appeared the smiling face of the lovely Elf whose coming she had waited for so long.
In every flower sat little smiling Elves, singing gayly as they rocked amid the leaves.
These fair things are your friends and playmates now, and they will teach you many pleasant lessons, and give you many happy hours; while the garden where you once sat, weeping sad and bitter tears, is now brightened by your own happiness, filled with loving friends by your own kindly thoughts and feelings; and thus rendered a pleasant summer home for the gentle, happy child, whose bosom flower will never fade.
He put the gas out, and sat on a chair in the hall, waiting and counting the minutes, longing for any human countenance.
The agent of the type- writer firm had come for the machine, and he sat on the bed while Martin, on the one chair, typed the last pages of the final chapter.
Martin roused himself and sat up and began to eat, between spoonfuls reassuring Maria that he had not been talking in his sleep and that he did not have any fever.
After she left him he sat drearily, with drooping shoulders, on the edge of the bed, gazing about him with lack-lustre eyes that saw nothing until the torn wrapper of a magazine, which had come in the morning's mail and which lay unopened, shot a gleam of light into his darkened brain.
He did it languidly, and, when he had finished, sat on the edge of the bed staring blankly before him.
I was still cold when under one of the trees I found a huge cloak, with which I covered myself, and sat down upon the ground.
I was pained at this and sat still watching the operation of the fire.
An old man sat in it, near a fire, over which he was preparing his breakfast.