Pull the other one (it's got bells on)!

Pull the other one (it's got bells on)!

Used to express that one finds what's been said to be incredible, unlikely, or laughable. Primarily heard in UK. You, the descendant of a king? Pull the other one, mate! A: "I think the country would be way better off if we just abolished taxes altogether." B: "Yeah, OK, pull the other one, it's got bells on!"
See also: bell, one, other, pull

pull the other one

BRITISH, INFORMAL
If someone tells you something and you say pull the other one, you mean that you do not believe them. The government is willing to expose the true level of unemployment in the country? Yeah, right, pull the other one. Note: People sometimes say pull the other one, it's got bells on it. `The Duchess gave it to me.' — `Think I'd believe that? Pull the other one, it's got bells on it.' Note: `One' in this expression refers to someone's leg. See the explanation for `pull someone's leg' at `leg'.
See also: one, other, pull

pull the other one

used to express a suspicion that you are being deceived or teased. British informal
A fuller form of this expression is pull the other one, it's got bells on .
1994 Sunday Times Michael Foot receive a warm ovation from the CBI? Norman Tebbit address a TUC conference? Pull the other one.
See also: one, other, pull

pull the ˈother one (— it’s got ˈbells on!)

(British English, spoken) used to show that you do not believe what somebody has just said: ‘I’ve been offered a job in New York.’ ‘Pull the other one!’ ‘No, really!’
See also: one, other, pull