pine

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Related to Pines: piles

ride the pine

In sports (especially baseball), to remain sitting on the bench, rather than be an active participant in the game. Primarily heard in US. I'm not going to play next year if coach makes me ride the pine again this season. I rode the pine for the rest of the game after I pulled my hamstring sliding to first base.
See also: pine, ride

pine after someone or something

 and pine for someone or something; pine over someone or something
to long for or grieve for someone or something. Bob pined after Doris for weeks after she left. Dan is still pining for his lost dog. There is no point in pining over Claire.
See also: after, pine

pine away (after someone or something)

to waste away in melancholy and longing for someone or something. A year later, he was still pining away after Claire. Still, he is pining away.
See also: away, pine

pine away

v.
To wither or waste away from longing or grief: After its owner was killed, the old dog pined away and died.
See also: away, pine

pine for

v.
To long or grieve intensely for someone or something: All summer he sat in the garden pining for his girlfriend back home. Many teachers pine for the days when students were better behaved.
See also: pine
References in classic literature ?
Meanwhile, Antaeus had scrambled upon his feet again, and pulled his pine tree out of the earth; and, all aflame with fury, and more outrageously strong than ever, he ran at Hercules, and brought down another blow.
But once more Hercules warded off the stroke with his club, and the Giant's pine tree was shattered into a thousand splinters, most of which flew among the Pygmies, and did them more mischief than I like to think about.
Since I've broken your pine tree, we'll try which is the better man at a wrestling match.
He looked round wildly in the direction from which the dazzling missile had come, and saw that at this point the sable facade of fir and pine was interrupted by a smaller road at right angles; which, when he turned it, brought him in full view of the long, lighted house, with a lake and fountains in front of it.
But the little priest only walked slower and slower in the dim cloister of pine, and at last stopped dead, on the steps of the house.
When he tried to think of the Alice he loved he saw, not the shadowy spirit occupant of the west gable, but the young girl who had stood under the pine, beautiful with the beauty of moonlight, of starshine on still water, of white, wind-swayed flowers growing in silent, shadowy places.
Instead, he cut a loose handful of daffodils and, looking furtively about him as if committing a crime, he laid them across the footpath under the pine.
Thereafter, every day she found flowers under the pine tree; she wished to see Jasper to thank him, unaware that he watched her daily from the screen of shrubbery in his garden; but it was some time before she found the opportunity.
She always found his flowers under the pine, and she always wore some of them, but she did not know if he noticed this or not.
As the wind died in the most distant pine woods with a long hoot as of mockery Father Brown, with an utterly impassive face, went on:
They had come up on the grassy scalp of the hill, one of the few bald spots that stood clear of the crashing and roaring pine forest.
The tops of the pine trees and the roofs of Horsell came out sharp and black against the western afterglow.
They gathered a bundle of wood, piled it up at the foot of the pine, and set fire to it.
One of the children pointed up Pine Street toward Seventh.
Up Pine street, from the railroad yards, was coming a rush of railroad police and Pinkertons, firing as they ran.