pavement

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hit the pavement

1. To walk outside, especially on the streets or sidewalk. I need to get out, hit the pavement, and start looking for a job.
2. To begin or take part in a strike. The workers hit the pavement again after the company implemented a unilateral pay cut to all employees.
See also: hit, pavement

hit the bricks

 and hit the pavement 
1. Fig. Inf. to start walking; to go into the streets. I have a long way to go. I'd better hit the bricks. Go on! Hit the pavement! Get going!
2. Inf. Fig. to go out on strike. The workers hit the pavement on Friday and haven't been back on the job since. Agree to our demands, or we hit the bricks.
See also: brick, hit

pound the pavement

Fig. to walk through the streets looking for a job. I spent two months pounding the pavement after the factory I worked for dosed. Hey, Bob. You'd better get busy pounding those nails unless you want to be out pounding the pavement.
See also: pavement, pound

pound the pavement

1. to look for a job Mary had children to feed, so she kept pounding the pavement until she finally landed a job at a burger restaurant.
2. to look for money or support She's been going out and pounding the pavement, raising money for research. Day after day, they pound the pavement, hoping to share a message about their religious faith.
See also: pavement, pound

hit the bricks

Go out on strike, as in The union voted to hit the bricks as soon as their contract expired. [Slang; 1940s]
See also: brick, hit

pound the pavement

Walk the streets, especially in search of employment. For example, He was fired last year and he's been pounding the pavement ever since. A similar usage is pound a beat, meaning "to walk a particular route over and over"; it is nearly always applied to a police officer. [Early 1900s]
See also: pavement, pound

hit the bricks

and hit the pavement
1. tv. to start walking; to go into the streets. I have a long way to go. I’d better hit the bricks.
2. tv. to go out on strike. The workers hit the pavement on Friday and haven’t been back on the job since.
See also: brick, hit

hit the pavement

verb
See also: hit, pavement

hit the bricks

Slang
To go on strike.
See also: brick, hit

pound the pavement

Slang
To travel the streets on foot, especially in search of work.
See also: pavement, pound
References in classic literature ?
He looked down and saw her standing on the pavement edge, an alert, commanding figure, which waited its season to cross, and then walked boldly and swiftly to the other side.
On Sundays, after walking four times to and fro between the place Royale and Saint- Paul's church (for her mother made her practise the precepts and the duties of religion), her parents took her to the pavement in front of the Cafe Ture, where they sat on chairs placed between a railing and the wall.
The question was unexpectedly and suddenly answered for her, by the colourless boy, Bitzer, who came round the corner with such blind speed and so little anticipating a stoppage on the pavement, that he brought himself up against Mr.
As he said it, he rose, shook himself, scratched himself, tied his brown coat loosely round his neck by the sleeves (he had previously used it as a coverlet), and sat down upon the pavement yawning, with his back against the wall opposite to the grating.
Jerry of course came back to the stand, but in about ten minutes one of the shopmen called him, so we drew up to the pavement.
No need to listen for doors opening--to fancy steps on the pavement or the gravel-walk
Doors opened, and people came and went, in the houses on either side; children by the dozen poured out on the pavement to play, and invaded the little strips of garden-ground to recover lost balls and shuttlecocks; streams of people passed backward and forward perpetually; heavy wagons piled high with goods lumbered along the road on their way to, or their way from, the railway station near; all the daily life of the district stirred with its ceaseless activity in every direction but one.
Then Ulysses tore off his rags, and sprang on to the broad pavement with his bow and his quiver full of arrows.
Slowly, silently we wandered From the open cottage door, Underneath the elm's long branches To the pavement bending o'er; Underneath the mossy willow And the dying sycamore.
Only the poet or the saint can water an asphalt pavement in the confident anticipation that lilies will reward his labour.
One afternoon in the beginning of October when the traffic was becoming brisk a tall man strode along the edge of the pavement with a lady on his arm.
Whatever the creature was that had seized him, it apparently had a well-defined purpose in mind, for it walked directly toward the edge of the roof so that it was soon apparent to Tarzan that he was to be hurled to the pavement below--a most efficacious manner of disposing of an intruder.
Here and there, an odd taxicab which had escaped the police orders came along with one lamp lit, only to be stopped in a few yards and escorted to the edge of the pavement.
AN Author saw a Labourer hammering stones into the pavement of a street, and approaching him said:
From pavement to pavement, and covering the sidewalks, it lay there, spread out quite evenly, with only here and there a lump or mound of bodies to break the surface.