packet

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pay packet

1. Literally, an envelope or small parcel containing an employee's earnings. Primarily heard in UK. Back when I started working here, before online banking and direct debit, everyone got their pay packet put in their hand at the end of each week.
2. By extension, a person's salary or rate of pay from an employer. Primarily heard in UK. The public outcry has been immense over revelations of the charity CEO's outrageous annual pay packet.
See also: packet, pay

cop a packet

To be seriously injured. This phrase originated in the military. I got sent home after copping a packet during my tour of duty.
See also: cop, packet

make a packet

To make a very large amount of money, especially by doing something very successfully. We'll make a packet if we can manage to secure a trading partner in China. I hear Sarah is making a packet with sales from her latest novel.
See also: make, packet

earn a packet

To earn a very large amount of money, especially by doing something very successfully. We'll earn a packet if we can manage to secure a trading partner in China. I hear Sarah is earning a packet with sales from her latest novel.
See also: earn, packet

lose a packet

To lose a very large amount of money, especially all at the same time. The sudden plunge in the company's stock price meant investors around the world have lost a packet. I vowed never to go into a casino again after losing a packet at the slot machines last Saturday.
See also: lose, packet

spend a packet

To spend a very large amount of money, especially all at the same time. We spent a packet securing our partnership with the Chinese manufacturers. I hear Sarah is spending a packet to have her novel self-published.
See also: packet, spend

cop a packet

to become badly injured; to be wounded severely. (Originally military.) My uncle copped a packet in Normandy. If you want to cop a packet or worse, just stand up in that shallow trench, son.
See also: cop, packet

cop a packet

1 be killed, especially in battle. 2 contract a venereal disease. informal euphemistic
See also: cop, packet

make, lose, spend, etc. a ˈpacket

(informal) make, etc. a large amount of money: He went to the USA and made a packet in office property.We spent a packet on our weekend away — everything was so expensive.
See also: packet
References in classic literature ?
The fire, choked between a couple of smouldering pieces of wood, had died down for the first few moments after the packet was thrown upon it.
The packet had been wrapped in a threefold covering of newspaper, and the, notes were safe.
It's all his--the whole packet is for him, do you hear--all of you?
I was passing close to the door of the captain's cabin, which was half open, and I saw him give the packet and letter to Dantes.
You have hit it, Cousin Dickon; it is the executive office of the county; at least so said my father when he gave me this packet to offer you as a Christmas-box.
cried the impatient gentleman, snatching the packet from her hand; “there is no such office in the county.
The traditional packet scheduling algorithm used in most systems is First-In-First-Out (FIFO), which places all packets into a single queue and processes them in the same order in which they are received.
Packet loss describes an error condition in which data packets appear to be transmitted correctly at one end of a connection, but never arrive at the other end.
SwitchCore AB, developer of integrated switching devices for Internet and data communications, has announced that World Wide Packets, Inc.
World Wide Packets has worked closely with its customers to integrate crucial PBT support into its offerings and now enables the highest quality delivery of Carrier Ethernet service available today.
If the newly formed packet is bigger than the MTU (maximum transmission unit) size of any of the links between CPE A and CPE B then the packet will need to be fragmented into two packets.
World Wide Packets Announces Ethernet Services Manager 4.
The biggest complaint of users today is slow Web page response, which results from Internet congestion: too many packets flying around.
World Wide Packets, a leading provider of Carrier Ethernet solutions, announced today that members of its LightningEdge Carrier Ethernet product family have received official compliance from Underwriters Laboratory through its Network Equipment Building System (NEBS) Test Program.
These additional packets impose an additional processing burden on the system.