orange

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go gathering orange blossoms

To look for a wife. The phrase refers to the frequent use of orange blossoms as wedding decorations symbolizing the bride's innocence. I'm quite certain that Sir Andrew went to town to go gathering orange blossoms, so we'd best get ready for a wedding!

mix apples and oranges

To combine or compare two different things. You can't compare your job as a nurse to mine as an engineer—that's mixing apples and oranges!
See also: and, apple, mix, orange

apples and oranges

Two unlike things or people. Oh, you can't compare those two companies, they're apples and oranges! My mom and my mother-in-law are just apples and oranges and should not be left alone in the same room for too long.
See also: and, apple, orange

apples and oranges

Fig. two entities that are not similar. (Used especially in reference to comparisons of unlike things.) You can't talk about Fred and Ted in the same breath! They're like apples and oranges. Talking about her current book and her previous bestseller is like comparing apples and oranges.
See also: and, apple, orange

compare apples and oranges

to examine the similarities of things that are completely different Comparing the average wages of workers and managers is like trying to compare apples and oranges.
Usage notes: usually used to explain that two things cannot be compared
See also: and, apple, compare, orange

apples and oranges

  (American)
if two people or things are apples and oranges, they are completely different You can't compare inner city schools and schools in the suburbs - they're apples and oranges.
See also: and, apple, orange

apples and oranges

Unlike objects or persons, as in Assessing the problems of the neighborhood grocery by examining a giant supermarket is comparing apples and oranges . This metaphor for dissimilarity began as apples and oysters, which appeared in John Ray's proverb collection of 1670. It is nearly always accompanied by a warning that one cannot compare such different categories.
See also: and, apple, orange

apples to oranges

and A2O
phr. & comp. abb. [but that’s comparing] apples to oranges; [You are] making an unfair comparison. Chevvies and Beemers! That’s apples to oranges! They’re not even in the same class! It’s A2O! What can I say?
See also: apple, orange
References in classic literature ?
They waited a good while under the orange trees, till Madame Antoine came back, panting, waddling, with a thousand apologies to explain her absence.
It was very pleasant to stay there under the orange trees, while the sun dipped lower and lower, turning the western sky to flaming copper and gold.
Mazarin came within three steps of D'Artagnan and pushed a spring in the wall; the slab turned and the orange tree resumed its place.
Grandfather told how, at the first intelligence of the landing of the Prince of Orange in England, the people of Massachusetts rose in their strength and overthrew the government of Sir Edmund Andros.
There he was, sitting with a newly opened envelope in one hand and five dried orange pips in the outstretched palm of the other one.
The young man took from his waistcoat a crumpled envelope, and turning to the table he shook out upon it five little dried orange pips.
Its outrages were usually preceded by a warning sent to the marked man in some fantastic but generally recognised shape--a sprig of oak-leaves in some parts, melon seeds or orange pips in others.
As they came nearer Gahan saw that one was indeed Tara of Helium, but the other he did not recognize, and then they were brought to the center of the field midway between the two sides and there waited until the Orange Chief arrived.
The Orange Princess is the slave woman Lan-O of Gathol; the Black Princess is the slave woman Tara, a princess of Helium.
Another move and the game would be lost to Gahan unless the Orange Odwar was overthrown, or Tara moved to a position of safety; but to move his Princess now would be to admit his belief in the superiority of the Orange.
however gigantic the fortunes of the Grand Monarch loomed in the future, was William, Prince of Orange, son of William II.
in repealing the Perpetual Edict, and re-establishing the office of Stadtholder in favour of William of Orange, for whom the hand of Providence had traced out ulterior destinies on the hidden map of the future.
My idea,' exclaimed Miss Wren, 'is now about the size of an orange.
Tuckle took the chair, and was supported at the other end of the board by the gentleman in orange plush.
We consider you an inattentive reskel,' said the gentleman in the orange plush.