opera

(redirected from Operas)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to Operas: Rock operas, Soap operas

horse opera

A film or theatrical production about the American West (i.e., a western), especially one that is clichéd or formulaic. My grandfather and I had a tradition of watching old horse operas every Sunday on TV.
See also: horse, opera

hoss opera

A film or theatrical production about the American West (i.e., a western), especially one that is clichéd or formulaic. My grandfather and I had a tradition of watching old hoss operas every Sunday on TV.
See also: opera

oat opera

A film or theatrical production about the American West (i.e., a western), especially one that is clichéd or formulaic. My grandfather and I had a tradition of watching old oat operas every Sunday on TV.
See also: oat, opera

soap opera

1. A radio or television serial with stock characters in domestic dramas that are noted for being sentimental and melodramatic. For example, She just watches soap operas all day long. This term originated in the mid-1930s and was so called because the sponsors of the earliest such radio shows were often soap manufacturers.
2. Real-life situation resembling one that might occur in a soap opera, as in She just goes on and on about her various medical and family problems, one long soap opera . [1940s]
See also: opera, soap

horse opera

n. a Western movie. (see also oater.) They’re showing a series of old horse operas at the theater tonight.
See also: horse, opera
References in periodicals archive ?
Young opera singer Jenny Stafford, from Huddersfield, has embarked on a career in an art form that is often seen as elitist and inaccessible.
Opera buffs take heart: Even though Eugene Opera has come and gone with its one production of the season, a new player on the scene is offering an unusual performance next week - with four more to come this year.
Those traditional vexations pale in comparison to the challenge of confronting the ego of a genuine opera diva.
Based on Hurwitz's often clever observations, the reader can choose whether to explore these operas more in depth.
Propelled by a $6 million gift from billionaire philanthropist Eli Broad, the Los Angeles Opera announced Wednesday it will mount Wagner's ``Ring'' cycle, the complex four-opera opus considered the ultimate test of an opera company's resources.
I raised some questions here in our March issue about the the role of "modern" works in the current opera scene.
Beyond the tables and chairs, framed drawings of the world's great opera houses and posters for Puccini's Tosca and Turandot hang from one wall.
The Mother of Us, All, the 1940s opera by gay cocreators Gertrude Stein and Virgil Thomson, gets a glossy new production
His knowledge of Greek and Latin literature provides him with a context for many of the operas he discusses.
Sternfeld has presented an encyclopedic study which concentrates on some of the main themes and devices of opera from its pre-history in the Orpheus myth of classical antiquity to the neo-classical representations of the myth by Stravinsky and others.
An eighteenth-century engraving by William Hogarth satirises the vogue for foreign operas by showing the plays of Shakespeare and Ben Jonson relegated to the dustbin.
The Behind the Curtain at the LA Opera podcast is a great opportunity for us to leverage new media marketing to build anticipation for our operas with young audiences, technophiles and opera fans around the world," said Phil Koester, director of marketing, LA Opera.
Among the operas featured will be classics such as e Magic Flute, Don Giovanni and e Marriage of Figaro, as well as newly-produced works such as e Importance of Being Earnest by Gerald Barry.
Taymor is the theatrically trained, mythology-savvy director of plays, films and operas.
While they're all happy to get a call from a Broadway producer--Dendy is working on the new Boubil-Shonberg musical, The Pirate Queen, for next season--they also agree that choreographing operas makes a lot more sense.