neanderthal

(redirected from Neanderthals)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Neanderthals: Human evolution

neanderthal

(niˈændɚθɑl)
n. a large and ugly male. (see also caveman, cromagnon.) Tell that neanderthal to get out of here.
References in periodicals archive ?
Washington, June 26 ( ANI ): Researchers have claimed that Neanderthal diet while heavy on meat, also included plant tissues, such as tubers and nuts.
First are the assumptions behind O'Connell's proposal, which includes Neanderthals and early modern humans sharing similar life history traits and age structures.
Scientists isolated the parts of the modern human genetic blueprint that still contain Neanderthal remnants.
Researchers calculated that the Sima horminin lived about 400,000 years ago and shared a common ancestor with the Denisovans - a species from Asia related to the Neanderthals.
They will be showing who the Neanderthals were and how they lived, and visitors can also literally try their hand at cave art.
We are learning a lot more about Neanderthals, who made delicate tools and created art," she said.
Smaller social groups might have made Neanderthals less able to cope with harsh Eurasian environments because they would have had fewer friends to help them out in times of need.
The finding may explain why present-day Europeans have more Neanderthal DNA in their genetic make-up than Africans.
Researcher Dr Dolores Piperno said: "Our results indicate that Neanderthals made use of the diverse plant foods available in their local environment.
It's a ridiculous notion to suggest we could ever know the precise role that music played in the lives of the Neanderthals, but imagining it has been a fascinating experience," he says.
New research challenges the assumption our ancestors drove Neanderthals to extinction by outclassing them in tool technology.
Once dismissed as backward brutes, experts now want to know whether Neanderthals interbred with our ancestors, so making all modern humans part Neanderthal.
The conclusion is that Neanderthals spoke, but sounded rather different to us.
In their new study, Weaver and his colleagues crunched their fossil data using sophisticated mathematical models--and calculated that Neanderthals and modern humans split about 370,000 years ago.
After a nearly 30,000-year silence, Neanderthals are speaking once more, thanks to researchers who have modelled the hominids' larynx to replicate the possible sounds it would make, New Scientist says.