neanderthal


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neanderthal

(niˈændɚθɑl)
n. a large and ugly male. (see also caveman, cromagnon.) Tell that neanderthal to get out of here.
References in periodicals archive ?
While all samples contained signs of meat consumption, two samples showed traces of plants - the first direct evidence that Neanderthals may have enjoyed an omnivorous diet.
Morin sets up his study in a straightforward manner; he aims to test Jim O'Connell's (2006) intensification hypothesis, which proposes that early modern humans were able to expand demographically and replace Neanderthals because they had broader, more diverse diets.
However, in some places, such as the DNA related to the skin, the genetic instructions are as much as 70 percent Neanderthal and in other places there's virtually nothing from the species that's often portrayed as brutish cavemen.
Homo heidelbergensis are ancestors to humans, Denisovans and Neanderthals.
Although Neanderthal is now sometimes used as a term of abuse, they were not unintelligent, as they have been portrayed.
The Oxford scientists found that the eye sockets in Neanderthal skulls were on average 6mm larger than the early modern humans.
EARLY modern humans probably interbred with Neanderthals relatively soon after migrating out of Africa, research suggests.
The evidence, from cave sites in Iraq and Belgium, suggests Neanderthals controlled fire in much the same way as early modern humans living more than 30,000 years ago.
PROFILE: Norman the Neanderthal displaying an uncanny likeness to our columnist Denis Kilcommons (above) and (left) a Neanderthal skull.
His piece, Neanderthal, provides a musical backdrop as visitors journey through our ancestral past, looking at artefacts and remains that have been excavated across Wales after being buried for many thousands of years.
The 75-minute piece will be performed live by four musicians, singing and using stone instruments although Thorne is the first to admit that knowing exactly what Neanderthal music would have sounded like is impossible.
Certainly some big-brained types have started wondering whether part of our own genetic make-up has a hint of the Neanderthal.
By modelling the sounds that a Neanderthal larynx would have made, McCarthy's team engineered the sound of a Neanderthal saying "e.
The estimate is very close to those derived by other researchers who have dated the split based on clues from ancient Neanderthal and modern-day human DNA sequences.
After a nearly 30,000-year silence, Neanderthals are speaking once more, thanks to researchers who have modelled the hominids' larynx to replicate the possible sounds it would make, New Scientist says.