Ne


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je ne sais quoi

A positive or pleasant quality that is difficult to define. This French phrase translates to "I don't know what" in English. She had a certain je ne sais quoi that men found quite attractive.
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never the twain shall meet

These two people, things, or groups are so fundamentally different from one another that they will never be able to coexist or think alike. Primarily heard in US. My best friend is a staunch republican, while my brother is a hardcore liberal, and never the twain shall meet.
See also: meet, never, shall, twain

never the twain shall meet

or

ne'er the twain shall meet

LITERARY
People say never the twain shall meet or ne'er the twain shall meet when they believe that there are so many differences between two groups of people or two groups of things that they can never exist together. The British education system is notorious for separating the sciences and the humanities. This academic `ne'er the twain shall meet' policy does not always reflect the needs of the real world. Note: People often vary this expression. For example, they say that the twain should meet or the twain are not supposed to meet. Although they recognised differences between East and West, they went on to argue that the twain should and must meet. Note: `Twain' is an old-fashioned word meaning two. This is a quotation from `The Ballad of East and West' (1889) by the English poet Rudyard Kipling: `Oh, East is East, and West is West, and never the twain shall meet.'
See also: meet, never, shall, twain

ne plus ultra

The highest point of excellence, acme. Loosely translated from the Latin for “there is no reason to go further,” the phrase is a synonym of “zenith.” A new car with all the most modern features that any buyer could wish for (or so the manufacturer claims) might be touted as the ne plus ultra of automobiles. Legend has it that “ne plus ultra”—in its literal sense—was inscribed on Gibraltar's Pillars of Hercules as a warning to mariners not to venture, depending on the direction in which they were sailing, into the Atlantic Ocean or the Mediterranean Sea.
See also: Ne, plus