mutual admiration society

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mutual admiration society

A disparaging term for two (or more) people who engage in lavish mutual praise and admiration. I can't stand working with Tony and Linda. They praise each other from the moment they walk through the door—it's like they've formed a mutual admiration society!
See also: society

mutual admiration society

A relationship in which two people have strong feelings of esteem for each other and often exchange lavish compliments. The term may signify either genuine or pretended admiration, as in Each of them praised the other's book-it was a real mutual admiration society. The expression was invented by Henry David Thoreau in his journal (1851) and repeated by Oliver Wendell Holmes and others.
See also: society

mutual admiration society

Two or more people who lavishly praise the other person's or people's personalities and accomplishments, often far beyond what is deserved. The phrase, which is said to have originated with Henry David Thoreau in 1851, may have been used earlier. Its use as the title of a song from the 1956 musical comedy Happy Hunting that was successfully recorded by a number of singers boosted the phrase's popularity.
See also: society
References in periodicals archive ?
Mutuals started out serving the farm market and they pretty much stayed in that situation until recently.
But NAMIC thinks farming changes have little impact on mutuals.
Also, mutual holding companies aren't answerable to the market on a quarterly basis to the same extent as stock companies.
Restructuring into a mutual holding company is an easier and quicker process than demutualizing, said Gregg Dykstra, vice president of internal operations and general counsel for the National Association of Mutual Insurance Companies.
Mutuals can have a very entrenched culture, which can be very different from that of a stock company Analyzing the cultures and philosophies of the two companies, and finding ways to bring the cultures together and foster a rapprochement, are essential for the success of the newly combined company.
Those mutuals exploring their strategic options need to consider whether they can, over the long term, control their destiny.
Many mutuals, for example, are buying family-owned brokers/dealers to help sell or distribute their products.
Underperforming mutuals are not fulfilling the implicit contract that they have made with policyholders, and so they run the risk that members can be persuaded that they will benefit more from a forced demutualization rather than maintaining the status quo.
The company is one of a few large life insurers that have steadfastly defended the mutual structure and have publicly declared their intention to remain mutuals, including New York Life Insurance Co.
The possibility of increased capitalization and higher return on equity is luring more mutual insurance companies into the demutualization tide.
Several forces coming together may break the resistance of some property/casualty mutuals to convert to stock insurers.
Typically, mutuals tend to be overcapitalized in soft markets and undercapitalized in hard markets.
The program is designed to promote the benefits of a mutual (cooperative) operating structure while allowing individual institutions to retain their independence.
We're pleased to be the first partner in the Mutual Partnership Program," said Robert W.
would allow mutual insurers--which are owned by policyholders--to relocate to states that
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