mustard

(redirected from Mustards)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

after meat, mustard

A phrase emphasizing that something has come too late to be useful (like mustard after meat has already been eaten). A: "Here, I finished my project, Mr. Smith!" B: "Ah, after meat, mustard. I've already submitted your final grade, and it's too late to change it."
See also: after, mustard

the pope's mustard maker

A pompous person, especially one in an insignificant job or role. In the 14th century, Pope John XXII had a personal "moutardier" (mustard-maker), to ensure that his food was properly seasoned. All she does is copy files all day, but she acts like she's the pope's mustard maker. I practically have to beg for a chance to use the copier!
See also: maker, mustard

be as keen as mustard

To be very enthusiastic about something. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. These new kids are as keen as mustard to be in the choir, so we can definitely get them to clean up the choir room for us.
See also: keen, mustard

cut the mustard

1. slang To work or operate in a satisfactory manner. The origin of this phrase is debated. I need a new worker from the temp agency—the one you sent over keeps mixing up orders and just isn't cutting the mustard. This toaster doesn't cut the mustard anymore. No matter what setting you choose, your toast comes out charred!
2. slang To work or act with energy and enthusiasm, as is characteristic of the young. That guy looks like he's 110 years old—there's no way he'll be able to cut the mustard stocking shelves all day!
See also: cut, mustard

cut the cheese

 and cut the mustard
Sl. to release intestinal gas. (Crude. Use caution with the topic.) Who cut the cheese? People who cut the mustard in the car have to get out and walk.
See also: cheese, cut

not cut the mustard

not satisfactory or right for the situation Cutting taxes for the rich doesn't cut the mustard with most middle-class people.
Usage notes: sometimes used in the form cut the mustard: When you're a kid, you always think you have to prove that you can cut the mustard.
Related vocabulary: not cut it
See also: cut, mustard, not

can't cut the mustard

  (British, American & Australian) also can't cut it (British)
if you can't cut the mustard, you cannot deal with problems or difficulties If she can't cut the mustard, we'll have to find someone else to do the job.
See also: cut, mustard

be as keen as mustard

  (British & Australian old-fashioned)
to be very eager Why don't we ask Tom to captain the cricket team? He's as keen as mustard.
See also: keen, mustard

cut the mustard

Perform satisfactorily, as in We need a better catcher; this one just doesn't cut the mustard. The origin of this expression is disputed. Some believe it alludes to mustard in the sense of the best or main attraction (owing to its spicing up food), whereas others believe it is a corruption of pass muster. Still others hold that it concerns the preparation of mustard, which involves adding vinegar to mustard seed to "cut" (reduce) its bitterness. The expression is often in negative form, as in the example. [Slang; c. 1900]
See also: cut, mustard

cut the cheese

and cut the mustard and cut a muffin
tv. to release intestinal gas. (Usually objectionable.) People who cut the mustard in the car have to get out and walk! Somebody cut a muffin!
See also: cheese, cut

cut the mustard

verb
See also: cut, mustard

cut the mustard

1. tv. to be able to do something requiring youth or vigor. (Usually in the expression too old to cut the mustard.) Do you really think he can cut the mustard?
2. Go to cut the cheese.
See also: cut, mustard

cut the cheese

Vulgar Slang
To expel intestinal gas.
See also: cheese, cut

cut the mustard

To perform up to expectations or to a required standard.
See also: cut, mustard
References in periodicals archive ?
Like the mustards, Caramelized Onion Marmalade is made by hand in small batches and has a sweet roasted onion flavor derived from its main ingredient--white onions that are cooked for three hours and enriched with redcurrant juice.
If you're of the opinion that a meal just isn't complete without some form of alcohol, there are several Maille mustards that should be right up your street.
The oriental mustard is used in the manufacture of Chinese style mustards and in a number of Cajun and East Indian dishes.
Our friendly waitress offered us a selection of complementary mustards - a mild but perky tarragon and mascarpone mustard going well with the fish dishes, a honey mustard, and a delicious punchy mulled wine mustard which went beautifully with the steak pies.
The fish was superb while the accompaniments brought it to a whole new sphere - as did the dollops of tarragon and cream and mulled wine mustards I asked for.
Traditional Chinese medicine, ayurvedic practitioners, and other healing traditions versed in herbal treatments rely on mustard as an expectorant.
The three types are yellow, aka white (Sinapis alba), the mildest and used mainly in American-style mustards and for pickling; brown (Brassica juncea), zestier and used in European-style mustards [like Dijon], for pickling, and in Indian cooking; and black (B.
This indeed is an extremely hot, blowyour-head-off style of mustard.
A chance meeting between Bruce Young, proprietor of Shaken Oak Products and Richard Jenkinson, founder of The Chiltern Brewery, which is based near Aylesbury in Buckinghamshire, led to all invitation by the brewery to make some sample mustards to complement its range of food products using Chiltern Brewery Beers.
Incredible horseradish mustards also come from the German repertoire, as do fantastic beer-based mustards and whole-grain varieties.
The Heinz mustard sits between the US squeezy varieties and traditional English mustards so it is a different proposition to Colman's.
You'll find cubes of red, yellow, white, purple or other potatoes or shredded red, green, Savoy or Napa cabbages tossed with plain mayo, Miracle Whip, sour cream, yogurt, buttermilk, oils, vinegars, and lemon, lime or orange juices -- and jazzed up with glorious accents like yellow, Dijon or grainy mustards, dill or sweet pickles, pickle relishes, celery, green, red or white onions, radishes, chopped red or green peppers, tomatoes, celery, jicama or hard-cooked eggs, cucumbers, carrots, green beans, black beans, olives, horseradish, chutneys, cooked bacon, prosciutto, salami, feta, blue or other cheeses, freshly chopped chiles, garlic, fresh or dried fruits, nuts, assorted fresh herbs and seasonings and more.
Agricultural Research Service and university scientists are experimenting with mustards as an alternative to chemically fighting crop pests.