mountain

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have a mountain to climb

To have an extremely difficult, seemingly impossible task at hand. After losing Ohio to his opponent, the president now has a mountain to climb if he wants to hold on to his job.
See also: climb, have, mountain

have snow on the mountain

To have silver, grey, or white hair on one's head, as due to aging. Sure, I may have a bit of snow on the mountain, but I still lead as adventurous a life as I ever have!
See also: have, mountain, on, snow

snow on the mountain

Silver, grey, or white hair on one's head, as due to aging. Sure, there's a bit of snow on the mountain, but I still lead as adventurous a life as I ever have!
See also: mountain, on, snow

mountain oysters

A food made from animal testicles, often those of a sheep or calf. A: "Let's get some mountain oysters!" B: "Are you sure? Did you read the description in menu?"
See also: mountain, oyster

mountain to climb

A very difficult task or challenge. You certainly have a mountain to climb if you intend to get this project done by Thursday.
See also: climb, mountain

Faith will move mountains.

Prov. If you believe in what you are doing, you can overcome any obstacle. (Sometimes refers to faith in God.) Jane's faith in her cause could move mountains. You may feel disheartened sometimes, but remember that faith will move mountains.
See also: faith, mountain, move, will

If the mountain will not come to Mahomet, Mahomet must go to the mountain.

Prov. If things do not change the way you want them to, you must adjust to the way they are. (Mohammed is often used instead of Mahomet. Also the mountain has come to Mahomet, something or someone that you would not expect to travel has arrived. There are many variations of this proverb. See the examples.) The president won't see me so I will have to go to his office. If the mountain will not come to Mahomet, Mahomet must go to the mountain. If Caroline can't leave the hospital on her birthday, we'll have to take her birthday party to the hospital. If the mountain won't come to Mahomet, Mahomet will have to go to the mountain. It's true I don't usually leave my home, but if you can't come to see me, I'll have to come see you. The mountain will come to Mohammed.
See also: come, if, mountain, must, not, will

make a mountain out of a molehill

Cliché to make a major issue out of a minor one; to exaggerate the importance of something. Come on, don't make a mountain out of a molehill. It's not that important. Mary is always making mountains out of molehills.
See also: make, mountain, of, out

make a mountain out of a molehill

also make a molehill into a mountain
to cause something simple to seem much more difficult or important McAleer knows there's a mistake in the book and promised to correct it, but Rosen continues to complain about it - she's really trying to make a mountain out of a molehill. Clever lawyers can make a molehill into a mountain.
Usage notes: sometimes used in the form make a molehill out of a mountain (to cause something difficult to be much easier): By dividing up a big assignment and working on it a little bit every day, you can make a molehill out of a mountain.
Related vocabulary: blow something out of (all) proportion
See also: make, mountain, of, out

move mountains

to achieve something difficult Voters in his district have always recognized their representative's ability to move mountains.
See also: mountain, move

If Mohammed will not go to the mountain, the mountain must come to Mohammed.

something that you say which means that if someone will not come to you, you have to go to them
Usage notes: This phrase comes from a story about Mohammed who was asked to show how powerful he was by making a mountain come to him.
They never visit me now they have a family. Well, if Mohammed won't go to the mountain, the mountain must come to Mohammed.
See also: come, if, mountain, must, not, will

a mountain to climb

  (British & Australian)
something that is very difficult to do After a bad start to the season, the team has a mountain to climb if they want to win the league.
See also: climb, mountain

make a mountain out of a molehill

to make a slight difficulty seem like a serious problem (usually in continuous tenses) You're making a mountain out of a molehill. You wrote one bad essay - it doesn't mean you're going to fail your degree.
See also: make, mountain, of, out

move mountains

 
1. if someone or someone's beliefs or feelings can move mountains, they can achieve something that is very difficult If faith can move mountains, we'll win the Cup.
2. if you would move mountains for someone, they are so important to you that you would do anything to please them He'd move mountains for her but she treats him like dirt.
See also: mountain, move

if the mountain won't come to Muhammad, Muhammad must go to the mountain

If one can't have one's way, one must give in. For example, Since you can't come here for the holiday, I'll go to your house-if the mountain won't come to Muhammad, Muhammad must go to the mountain . This expression is based on a tale that Muhammad once sought proof of his teachings by ordering a mountain to come to him. When it did not move, he maintained that God had been merciful, for if it had indeed moved they all would have been crushed by it. [Late 1500s]
See also: come, if, mountain, must

make a mountain out of a molehill

Exaggerate trifling difficulties, as in If you forgot you racket you can borrow one-don't make a mountain out of a molehill. This expression, alluding to the barely raised tunnels created by moles, was first recorded in John Fox's The Book of Martyrs (1570).
See also: make, mountain, of, out

make a mountain

and pitch a tent
n. to have a morning erection that raises the covers; to have an erection that makes a bulge in one’s clothing; to get an erection. Bobby makes a mountain almost every morning. When I was in the hospital, I was afraid I would pitch a tent in the morning.
See also: make, mountain

(mountain) dew

1. n. Scotch whiskey. The real mountain dew is smoky-tasting and amber.
2. n. illicit liquor; any liquor. Mountain dew is what I want. As long as it’s not store bought.
See also: dew, mountain

make a mountain out of a molehill

To exaggerate a minor problem.
See also: make, mountain, of, out
References in classic literature ?
At a little distance to the south is a village named Guix, through which the way lies to the top of the mountain, from whence the traveller discovers a vast extent of land, which appears like a deep valley, though the mountain rises so imperceptibly that those who go up or down it are scarce sensible of any declivity.
Picture to yourselves," said I, "what this crater must have been when filled with boiling lava, and when the level of the incandescent liquid rose to the orifice of the mountain, as though melted on the top of a hot plate.
One September night a family had gathered round their hearth, and piled it high with the driftwood of mountain streams, the dry cones of the pine, and the splintered ruins of great trees that had come crashing down the precipice.
They beheld volcanic plains stretching around them, and ranges of mountains piled up to the clouds, and glistening with eternal frost: but knew nothing of their defiles, nor how they were to be penetrated or traversed.
Their posts beyond the mountains had to be supplied in yearly expeditions, like caravans, from Montreal, and the furs conveyed back in the same way, by long, precarious, and expensive routes, across the continent.
Its snow-clad mountains one hears so much about are only seen occasionally, and then in the distance, the Alps.
The man, like the mountain lion whom Michael had encountered up the mountain, had strayed down from the wilds of Mendocino County, following the ruggedest mountain stretches, and, at night, crossing the farmed valley spaces where the presence of man was a danger to him.
Newton," said Barbicane, "is the most perfect type of these annular mountains, of which the earth possesses no sample.
The mountains would become covered with snow and ice, and their former Alpine inhabitants would descend to the plains.
In this part of the valley, the mountains on each side were from 3000 to 6000 or 8000 feet high, with rounded outlines and steep bare flanks.
Before my highest mountain do I stand, and before my longest wandering: therefore must I first go deeper down than I ever ascended:
The rain was pouring in torrents, and thick mists hid the summits of the mountains, so that I even saw not the faces of those mighty friends.
But hills and mountains on that side showed bare and heated, though beautiful with the sunburnt tawniness of California.
Once upon a time there was a Glass Mountain at the top of which stood a castle made of pure gold, and in front of the castle there grew an apple-tree on which there were golden apples.
When they came to the mountain it proved to be a rugged, towering chunk of deep green glass, and looked dismal and forbidding in the extreme.
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