moose

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moose

n. a Korean girlfriend (in Korea); any girlfriend. (Crude. Military. More specifically, a Korean girl slave, bought by a G.I. from her parents.) She’s one fine moose, if you ask me.
References in periodicals archive ?
Moose have traditionally provided an important source of food and clothing for Native People inhabiting North American moose range (Crete 1987).
Non-resident moose hunting opportunities have been significantly reduced or eliminated in many jurisdictions (Timmermann and Buss 1998).
This would be an illegal kill of approximately 27,000 moose based on an estimated licensed harvest of 70,300 in 1982 (Timmermann 1987).
for example, moose liquidation or replacement costs are used to set a minimum fine schedule for illegal harvests.
Lacasse (1986) proposed a formula to determine an appropriate fine for moose poaching in Quebec by considering 3 variables: animal biomass, management costs, and socio-economic losses.
Moose are a dominant or keystone species throughout much of the boreal forests of North America (Bergerud and Manuel 1968, Paine 1988) and in pine/spruce forests of Sweden, Norway, and Finland (Lavsund 1987).
Forest damage has increased, concurrent with a moose population increase in Newfoundland (McLaren et al.
Some of the highest densities of moose in the world are found in Fennoscandia.
Moose population productivity was the theme of the workshop.
Murray Lankester was designated as the Distinguished Moose Biologist for his research into parasites, the many good students he has turned out, and his many years of hard work for the Alces cause.
The theme was the biology and management of Shiras moose in western North America.
Intensive forest management and moose was the theme of the conference.
The Distinguished Moose Biologist award went to Vic Van Ballenberghe, U.
The 1997 meeting was held in conjunction with the Fourth International Moose Symposium chaired by Charles Schwartz in Fairbanks, Alaska.
The Distinguished Moose Biologist Award went to Peter Jordan of the University of Minnesota for his long term studies on Isle Royale, and his many students that are now making their mark on the world.