month

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Related to Months: calendar

not in a month of Sundays

Not at any point; under absolutely no circumstances. Not in a month of Sundays did I think that I would actually win the lottery! John: "Do you think Samantha will agree to go on a date with Jake?" Tony: "Not in a month of Sundays!"
See also: month, not, of, Sundays

never in a month of Sundays

Not at any point; under absolutely no circumstances. Never in a month of Sundays did I think that I would actually win the lottery! John: "Do you think Samantha will agree to go on a date with Jake?" Tony: "Never in a month of Sundays!"
See also: month, never, of, Sundays

that/(one's) time of the month

The time, usually once a month, at which a woman begins to menstruate. I've had horrible cramps and have been really tired lately. It must be coming up on that time of the month again. A: "I made a joke about it being Sally's time of the month, and she punched me in the face!" B: "Good for her. You had it coming."
See also: month, of, time

a month of Sundays

An impossible event used as an analogy for something the speaker thinks will never happen. You want to borrow my car? Oh, sure—in a month of Sundays! He is never going to graduate, not in a month of Sundays.
See also: month, of, Sundays

by the day

one day at a time. I don't know when I'll have to leave town, so I rent this room by the day.

by the month

one month at a time. Not many apartments are rented by the month. I needed a car for a short while, so I rented one by the month.
See also: month

days running

 and weeks running; months running; years running
days in a series; months in a series; etc. (Follows a number.) I had a bad cold for five days running. For two years running, I brought work home from the office every night.
See also: days, running

(I) haven't seen you in a month of Sundays.

Rur. I haven't seen you in a long time. Tom: Hi, Bill Haven't seen you in a month of Sundays! Bill: Hi, Tom. Long time no see. Bob: Well, Fred! Come right in! Haven't seen you in a month of Sundays! Fred: Good to see you, Uncle Bob.
See also: month, of, seen, Sundays

in a coon's age

 and in a month of Sundays
Rur. in a very long time. (The coon is a raccoon.) How are you? I haven't seen you in a coon's age. I haven't had a piece of apple pie this good in a coon's age.
See also: age

flavor of the month

suddenly but temporarily popular This rap artist is pop music's current flavor of the month.
Etymology: based on the custom of selling a different special flavor of ice cream (frozen sweet food) every month
See also: flavor, month, of

month after month

repeatedly for many months You have to pay for Internet access month after month.
Related vocabulary: day after day
See also: after, month

month by month

every month I look at my bank statements month by month, and I can tell you to the penny how much we spend.
Related vocabulary: day by day
See also: month

the flavour of the month

  (British & Australian) also the flavor of the month (American & Australian)
someone or something that has suddenly become very popular, but may not remain popular for long Role-playing games are suddenly the flavour of the month.
See also: month, of

not in a month of Sundays

if you say that something will not happen in a month of Sundays, you mean that it is not likely to happen He'll never run the marathon, not in a month of Sundays.
See also: month, of, Sundays

by the day

Also, by the hour or week or month or year . According to a specific time period, as in I'm renting this car by the day, or He's being paid by the hour. This usage generally describes some kind of rate. [1400s]

month of Sundays, a

A long time, as in I haven't seen Barbara in a month of Sundays. This expression, which would literally mean thirty weeks, has been used hyperbolically since it was first recorded in 1832. One writer suggests it originally connoted a long dreary time, since games and other kinds of amusement used to be forbidden on Sunday.
See also: month, of

month of Sundays

Informal
An indefinitely long period of time: It will take you a month of Sundays to chop all that wood.
See also: month, of, Sundays
References in classic literature ?
From seven months onward until now, A has still been a usurper, and in my finger record he bears B's name.
This, of course, could not be had in a moment, and the five months that followed were the darkest days in the childhood of the telephone.
He returned in the month of August to Kouka; from there he successively traversed the Mandara, Barghimi, and Klanem countries, and reached his extreme limit in the east, the town of Masena, situated at seventeen degrees twenty minutes west longitude.
Within six months, everything that the family had dreaded from the marriage with the Polish count had come to pass.
I confess that what I saw during my month of travel and investigation left me with a very heavy heart.
The eight months had been well spent, and, in addition to what he had learned of right speaking and high thinking, he had learned much of himself.
Passing from the lapse of the summer months at Venice, to the lapse of the summer months in Ireland, it is next to be recorded that Mrs.
Avoid it; for this is the hardest month, wintry, hard for sheep and hard for men.
During these eight months Barbicane never quitted Stones Hill for a single instant.
Now I don't mind being here almost ten months, and I didn't miss the wedding, anyhow.
Beaufort had taken effectual measures to conceal himself, and it was ten months before my father discovered his abode.
Six months to look back on--six long, lonely months since Laura and I last saw each other!
I HAD now been in this unhappy island above ten months.
By virtue of this sentence he was, in the month of December, cast into Newgate for five years and ten months, and required besides to pay a large fine, and to furnish heavy securities for his future good behaviour.
Its difficulty was much enhanced by the mode of publication; for, it would be very unreasonable to expect that many readers, pursuing a story in portions from month to month through nineteen months, will, until they have it before them complete, perceive the relations of its finer threads to the whole pattern which is always before the eyes of the story-weaver at his loom.