Monday

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Related to Mondays: Monday's Child

Black Friday

1. Any day of major financial chaos or disaster; refers specifically to September 24, 1869, when stock speculators attempting to corner US gold trade caused the entire market to crash. The extremely fast growth in Wall Street has some economists worried that another Black Friday might be ahead if such growth continues unchecked.
2. The day after Thanksgiving in the US, on which extravagant sales create a frenzy of consumer activity in stores across the country. I hate working in retail on Black Friday—everyone acts like a crazy person!
See also: black, Friday

Monday morning quarterback

A person who acts like he or she has all the answers to a problem, especially in hindsight, usually without having any experience in that area. Likened to fans and commentators who criticize a football team after a Sunday game. Primarily heard in US. Social media seems to have turned everyone into a Monday morning quarterback whenever political issues are discussed.

come Monday

Rur. when Monday comes. (Can be used with other expressions for time, as in come next week, come December, come five o'clock. See the second example.) Joe plays so hard on the weekend that come Monday, he's all worn out. You may think that putting up storm windows is a bother, but come December, you'll be glad you did it.
See also: come, Monday

Monday's child is fair of face.

Prov. A child born on Monday will be good-looking. (This comes from a rhyme that tells what children will be like, according to which day they are born: "Monday's child is fair of face, / Tuesday's child is full of grace, / Wednesday's child is full of woe, / Thursday's child has far to go, / Friday's child is loving and giving, / Saturday's child works hard for a living, / But a child that is born on the Sabbath day / Is blithe and bonny, good and gay.") Joan is so pretty, she must be a Monday's child. Monday's child is fair of face.
See also: child, face, fair, of

a Monday morning quarterback

  (American)
someone who says how an event or problem should have been dealt with, after other people have already dealt with it It's easy to be a Monday morning quarterback when you see the kids' low test scores, but there are no easy answers to improving education.

that Monday morning feeling

  (informal)
if you have that Monday morning feeling, you are unhappy that the weekend has finished and you have to go back to work 'You look fed up. What's wrong?' 'Oh, it's just that Monday morning feeling.'
See also: feeling, Monday, morning

Black Friday

1. Also Black Monday, Black Tuesday, etc. A day of economic catastrophe, as in We feared there'd be another Black Friday. This usage dates from September 24, 1869, a Friday when stock manipulators Jay Gould and James Fisk tried to corner the gold market and caused its collapse. The adjective black has been appended to similar occasions ever since, including October 29, 1929, the Tuesday of the market collapse that marked the start of the Great Depression, and Black Monday of October 19, 1987, when the stock market experienced its greatest fall since the Great Depression.
2. Any day marked by great confusion or activity, as in It was just my luck to be traveling on Black Tuesday. This usage, too, is based on the events of 1869, marked by economic chaos. It has since been extended to other kinds of confusion, such as an accident hampering traffic during the evening rush hour.
See also: black, Friday

Monday-morning quarterback

A person who criticizes or passes judgment from a position of hindsight, as in Ethel was a Monday-morning quarterback about all the personnel changes in her department-she always claimed to have known what was going to happen . This expression, first recorded in 1932, alludes to fans who verbally "replay" Sunday's football game the next day, the quarterback being the team member who calls the plays.
See also: quarterback
References in classic literature ?
And on Monday he made no remarks before leaving you?
Last Monday I had finished for the day and was dressing in my room above the opium den when I looked out of my window and saw, to my horror and astonishment, that my wife was standing in the street, with her eyes fixed full upon me.
All Sunday I was kept hard at work, and yet by Monday I had only got as far as H.
Hall Pycroft, whom he had never seen, was about to enter the office upon the Monday morning.
An exhibition of agricultural implements had been opened in the neighborhood, only two days since; and a public competition between rival machines was to be decided on the coming Monday.
When her dishes were washed and her bread sponge set and her hens fed Marilla remembered that she had noticed a small rent in her best black lace shawl when she had taken it off on Monday afternoon on returning from the Ladies' Aid.
I remember now that when I took off my shawl Monday afternoon I laid it on the bureau for a minute.
You deny absolutely having purchased strychnine from Albert Mace on Monday last?
Inglethorp, as a mere matter of form, would you mind telling us where you were on the evening of Monday, July 16th?
They knew us well enough to ask Helen to come and see them--at least, I was asked too, but Tibby's illness prevented me, so last Monday she went alone.
An' there's Monday mornin's, too, that I used ter hate so.
The man had looked at the address, and had said it was a roundabout way of delivering a letter directed to Cobb's Hole, to post it at Frizinghall-- and that, moreover, on a Saturday, which would prevent the letter from getting to its destination until Monday morning, Rosanna had answered that the delivery of the letter being delayed till Monday was of no importance.
You heard me refer this morning to Monday next, and to the necessity of setting the purple room in order.
You will please, Mr Pancks, to squeeze the Yard again, the first thing on Monday morning.
There,' he said jokingly, 'I'm coming here again next Monday at the same time, and mind you're here, my lad, to work it out.