meeting

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come-to-Jesus meeting

1. A spiritual meeting in which participants are encouraged to repent their sins and accept Jesus Christ as their savior. I've told her that I am an avid atheist, but she still insists on me attending one of her come-to-Jesus meetings.
2. Any meeting in which a frank, often unpleasant, conversation is held so as to bring to light and/or resolve some issue at hand. Boys, we're going to have a come-to-Jesus meeting about the drugs I found in the house, and if no one tells me the truth, then you're both going to get a whooping. The boss called us in for a real come-to-Jesus meeting about our sales for this quarter.
See also: meeting

meet (someone's) expectations

To be as good as or have the qualities that someone predicted, expected, or hoped for. We'd heard so many good things about the new restaurant, but the food didn't meet our expectations at all. I'm so excited for the latest movie in the series—I hope it meets my expectations!
See also: expectation, meet

meet head-on

To confront or otherwise handle something directly. I'm nervous about having to make a presentation to the entire board, but it is a challenge I will meet head-on.
See also: meet

meet the eye

To be visible or noticeable. Perhaps most commonly used in the saying "more than meets the eye." A: "Did I put up too many decorations?" B: "Well, they were the first thing to meet the eye!"
See also: eye, meet

monthly meeting

A recurring administrative gathering in the Quaker religion. Our monthly meeting is this weekend—will I see you there?
See also: meeting, monthly

meeting of (the) minds

A situation in which two or more people reach an understanding or agreement. There was a meeting of the minds between finance industry leaders and law enforcement in order to help curb financial fraud. After debating for hours, we finally came to a meeting of minds and decided on a name for our band.
See also: meeting, mind, of

call a meeting

to ask that people assemble for a meeting; to request that a meeting be held. The mayor called a meeting to discuss the problem. I'll be calling a meeting of the library board to discuss the new building project.
See also: call, meeting

call a meeting to order and call the meeting to order

to announce that a meeting is about to begin. The chair called the meeting to order. The meeting will be called to order at noon.
See also: and, call, meeting, order

Fancy meeting you here!

I am very surprised to meet you here! Tom: Hi, Sue! Fancy meeting you here! Sue: Hi, Tom. I was thinking the same thing about you. "Fancy meeting you here," said Mr. Franklin when he bumped into the company president at the racetrack.
See also: fancy, meeting

hold a meeting

to meet; to have a meeting (of an organization). We'll have to hold a meeting to make a decision. Our club held a meeting to talk about future projects.
See also: hold, meeting

How do you do.

a standard inquiry and response on greeting or meeting someone. (This expression never has rising question intonation, but the first instance of its use calls for a response. Sometimes the response does, in fact, explain how one is.) Sally: Hello. How do you do. Bob: How do you do. Mary: How do you do. So glad to meet you, Tom. Tom: Thank you. How are you? Mary: Just fine. Your brother tells me you like camping. Tom: Yes. Are you a camper? Mary: Sort of.
See also: how

meeting of the minds

the establishment of agreement; complete agreement. After a lot of discussion we finally reached a meeting of the minds. We struggled to bring about a meeting of the minds on the issues.
See also: meeting, mind, of

Nice meeting you.

It is nice to have met you. (Said when leaving someone whose acquaintance you have just made.) I must go now, Fred. Nice meeting you. Well, nice meeting you. I must get home now.
See also: meeting, nice

Sunday-go-to-meeting clothes

Rur. one's best clothes. (See also Sunday best.) John was all dressed up in his Sunday-go-to-meeting clothes. I hate to be wearing my Sunday-go-to-meeting clothes when everyone else is casually dressed.
See also: clothes

a meeting of the minds

(slightly formal)
a situation in which people find that they have similar ideas and opinions There was a true meeting of minds between the two leaders during the six-hour talks.
See also: meeting, mind, of

a meeting of minds

  (slightly formal)
a situation in which two people find that they have the same ideas and opinions and find it easy to agree with each other Government officials say there was a meeting of minds between the two leaders during the six-hour talks in Pretoria.
See also: meeting, mind, of

how do you do

A conventional greeting used mostly after being introduced to someone, as in And this is our youngest-say "How do you do" to Mr. Smith. Although it is a question, it requires no reply. Originally, in the 1600s, this expression was an inquiry after a person's health or standing, how do you do meaning "how do you fare?" Today we usually express this as How are you? or How are you doing? or How goes it? or How's it going? Even more general are the slangy locutions How are things? or How's tricks? All of these greetings date from the first half of the 1900s.
See also: how

meeting of the minds

Agreement, concord, as in The teachers and the headmaster had a meeting of the minds regarding smoking in school. This expression uses meet in the sense of "arrive at mutual agreement," as clergyman Edward B. Pusey did in a letter of 1851: "Devout minds, of every school ... meet at least in this."
See also: meeting, mind, of

nice meeting you

tv. it is nice to have met you. (Said when leaving someone whose acquaintance you have just made.) I must go now, Fred. Nice meeting you.
See also: meeting, nice

meeting of the minds

Agreement; concord.
See also: meeting, mind, of

Sunday-go-to-meeting clothes

Best finery. Churchgoers never wore their everyday clothing to worship service. Instead, they wore their Sunday best, their Sunday-go-to-meeting clothes.
See also: clothes
References in classic literature ?
At any rate it would be worth while overtaking them if even only for the pleasure of meeting again creatures of his own kind.
As we then had no room large enough to accommodate all who would be present, the place of meeting was under a large improvised arbour, built partly of brush and partly of rough boards.
At that meeting he was struck for the first time by the endless variety of men's minds, which prevents a truth from ever presenting itself identically to two persons.
This is permissible at any stage of a Salvation Army meeting.
We found it; a little bit of a concern, up over a carpenter shop -- carpenters and printers all gone to the meeting, and no doors locked.
Catherine surveyed him with grief and astonishment: she changed the ejaculation of joy on her lips to one of alarm; and the congratulation on their long-postponed meeting to an anxious inquiry, whether he were worse than usual?
After this meeting at the new moon, I am to be given in marriage to Masilo," said the maid.
It was a political meeting, sir," replied the porter.
The word wind, in this passage, suggested to the minds of some, who afterwards gave an account of this meeting, a coincidence which might, in the spirit of the times, be construed into a special appointment of Providence.
So, as I was saying, being all ready for the meeting, and no horse to ride on, I made up my mind to foot it; for they tell me there is a nice young man to be taken into communion to-night.
Not one of us is safe while this fierce creature is alive, and we had called a meeting to decide how to take care of ourselves when you came among us.
Carey passed the dissenting ministers in the street she stepped over to the other side to avoid meeting them, but if there was not time for this fixed her eyes on the pavement.
Casaubon, had felt it better that he and she should not meet again, and perhaps she was wrong to wish for a meeting that others might find many good reasons against.
In a way, their meeting the next morning was fortuitous enough, yet it had also its significance for both of them.
There was to be a political meeting at the market hall, in the neighboring town; and the member was expected to make an oration, passing in review contemporary events at home and abroad.